September/October 2019

| From Our Editors

Mike Prokopeak, Editor in Chief
Who does your company serve? If you said customers you’re only partly right.

Customers buy products but shareholders pay the bills. If your company is listed on any stock exchange, then shareholders are who you really serve.

Much is done by bosses in their name. From slashing payrolls to pursuing mergers, the singular aim is to deliver profits to stockholders. According to decades-old business philosophy, shareholders come above everyone else.

So it was a big deal when the Business Roundtable, an influential group of CEOs, announced last month that companies have a “fundamental commitment” to all stakeholders, including customers, employees and communities.

What does it mean in practice? We’ll wait and see but it’s a sign of the power employees have in the modern economy and a reminder to HR to up its game. CEOs are listening.

—Mike Prokopeak,
Editor in Chief

The workplace has changed a lot since 1922. That year The Journal of Personnel Research debuted, rebranded later as Personnel Journal and finally Workforce. Now in our 97th year, we take a look back at what was on the minds of past generations of people managers.

A Woman’s Place in the Workforce, December 1958

As the 1950s came to a close, government economist Agnes W. Mitchell looked forward to the 1960s and women’s place in the workforce. “To remove women from the business world would result in the collapse of the entire structure, “ wrote Mitchell in “Women Working — in the 1960s.”

In 1958, 33 percent of the workforce was comprised of women, and Mitchell suggested that out of the 10 million workers expected to join the workforce by 1965, half would be women. She also noted that the trend of more women working was happening at the same time that women were getting married earlier than before. Half of women were married by 21 and 93 percent by age 35. It was becoming acceptable, at least for middle- and upper-class women, to enter the labor market because it was what they wanted rather than out of economic necessity.

Mitchell added that automation brought uncertainty to the future of working women. “Employers have traditionally dismissed women rather than men during reductions in force. Will automation cause any significant unemployment for women?”

The article also contained “facts” that would sound silly or sexist now. “A majority of women are believed to have had job experience at some point during their lives.” She also explained how women tend not to have supervisory positions because “male supervisors are frequently preferred by both men and women.”

Andie Burjek

 

As the 1950s came to a close, government economist Agnes W. Mitchell looked forward to the 1960s and women’s place in the workforce. “To remove women from the business world would result in the collapse of the entire structure, “ wrote Mitchell in “Women Working — in the 1960s.”

In 1958, 33 percent of the workforce was comprised of women, and Mitchell suggested that out of the 10 million workers expected to join the workforce by 1965, half would be women. She also noted that the trend of more women working was happening at the same time that women were getting married earlier than before. Half of women were married by 21 and 93 percent by age 35. It was becoming acceptable, at least for middle- and upper-class women, to enter the labor market because it was what they wanted rather than out of economic necessity.

Mitchell added that automation brought uncertainty to the future of working women. “Employers have traditionally dismissed women rather than men during reductions in force. Will automation cause any significant unemployment for women?”

The article also contained “facts” that would sound silly or sexist now. “A majority of women are believed to have had job experience at some point during their lives.” She also explained how women tend not to have supervisory positions because “male supervisors are frequently preferred by both men and women.”

Andie Burjek

Beware! Baby Boomers Ahead September 1980
Look no further than the September 1980 of Personnel Journal to see how entrenched personnel managers viewed the generational onslaught of … baby boomers!

We’re talking about those whippersnappers born in the mid- to late 1950s. The established personnel leaders of course came from the Silent Generation who were anything but silent in a panel discussion about the changing workforce. Said Douglas Marr, AVP of an insurance firm: “It was different 20 years ago. You paid your dues and worked your way up the corporate ladder.” Personnel administrator Jason B. Strode stated: “We have young people adjusting to work life … and the conflicts between their expectations and older employees and their values … impact the organization.” Marr also noted: “We have a whole populace of generally conservative people who are facing a new group of workers who expect freedom of choice, to have a say in the organization and manage their own careers.”

It’s clear that personnel managers in 1980 were as obsessed with managing a new generation as today’s HR pros. Marsha Sinetar’s piece “Management in the New Age: An Exploration of Changing Work Values” leads with “The management practices of the ’60s and ’70s will not do for the 1980s.” Concluding the “some things don’t change” refrain, Phillip J. Decker covered “Homosexuality and Employment: A Case Law Review.” We may call it LGBTQ rights today, but yeah. The case for workplace equality continues.

Rick Bell

Facing the Caregiving Crisis
Facing the Caregiving Crisis

On The Cover

WHO CARES

Millions of Americans like Mani Mueller, right, are unpaid caregivers. Diana Clark is the benefits manager at Mueller’s employer Promega, which now has caregiver leave.

Cover Photo by Paulius Musteikis
Out of Sight Out of Their Minds
Out of Sight Out of Their Minds

Sector Report

44

SECTOR REPORT: HRMS PROVIDERS

HR leaders are less than impressed with their cloud-based HR systems. They may be partly to blame.

46

SECTOR REPORT: STAFFING PROVIDERS

How staffing agencies are adapting to the supply and demand gap throughout corporate America.

FEATURES

22

FACING THE CAREGIVING CRISIS

How much do employers care about their employee caregiver population? That depends.

32

MENTAL HEALTH PARITY

Not all health care is created equally. Behavioral health care still lags in many company health care plans.

36

REMOTELY HEALTHY

Roll out of bed whenever, dress however, the image of the remote worker is one who is healthy and happy. Not necessarily.

40

MAYBE YOU’RE AWARE

Despite people’s belief in their self-​awareness, there’s a lack of it. Follow these steps to improve it in your organization.

Maybe You’re Aware… Self-Awareness Is in Short Supply
The Mental Health Parity Challenge
The Mental Health Parity Challenge

On The Web

speak up!

The Workforce online community provides you with virtual meeting places to chat about issues and trends affecting you and your workplace.
 

Join the group:
workforce.com/linkedingroup

Columns

4

your force

The Power of Employees and the Modern Economy

13

WORK IN PROGRESS

Balancing the 3 Types of Work-Life Balance

17

Benefits beat

Benefits Can Help Ward Off Loneliness

20

THE PRACTICAL EMPLOYER

Beware ‘Religious Exemption’ Plan

50

THE LAST WORD

Training for an Unnatural Disaster

For Your Benefit

14

REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS

Employers hear from a growing segment of employees who seek benefits for family planning.

15

BABIES ON BOARD

March of Dimes updates wellness tools in its “Healthy Babies, Healthy Business” program for premature births.

15

FINANCIAL PLAN

Finance experts urge HR to get employees to think more like investors when it comes to retirement planning.

16

SEVENTY-YEAR ITCH

Experts contend that 70 is the golden age for employees to maximize their Social Security benefits.

Trending

10

HITTING A HIGH NOTE

“Harmonizing” touted as a way to keep HR technology humming.

11

PEOPLE MOVES AND BY THE NUMBERS

Dennis Berger builds culture forSuffolk; Mental health at work.

12

Q&A

Author Michael Ventura, CEO of Sub Rosa, talks workplace empathy.

12

WORKPLACE RIGHTS

Companies signing on for LGBTQ inclusion push.

Legal

18

Successful Prevention

10 harassment prevention points to keep in mind.

19

LEGAL BRIEFINGS

Arbitration; No-poach policies.

Trending

‘Harmonizing’ to Keep HR Technology Hitting the Same Note
By cataloging and documenting, companies are enhancing consistency, efficiency and effectiveness.

By Mark Feffer

E

mployee demand for consumer-like experiences, the increasing use of people analytics and the falling costs of hardware and software are dramatically driving the spread of HR technology. By 2025, the HR management systems market is expected to grow to $30 billion, more than doubling the $12.6 billion recorded in 2016, according to Grand View Research.

Faced with a mind-boggling array of solutions, encompassing everything from full talent-management suites to narrowly focused products that measure components of employee engagement, both technology vendors and customers are thinking more and more about “harmonization.”

In HR technology-speak, harmonization is the knitting together of products so users benefit from a single experience, as well as a data set that cuts across organizational and technical silos. The idea “is definitely something that’s become more prevalent,” said Jeremy Ames, president of Hive Tech HR, a Massachusetts-based HR technology consultant.

PEOPLE
Dennis BergerDennis Berger
Construction company Suffolk named Dennis Berger as chief culture officer. Berger will oversee Suffolk’s people and culture team and will be responsible for creating a top employee experience across the entire employee life cycle. Berger has more than 30 years of experience across all facets of HR and people management, including the last 14 years as chief human resources officer.
April Castañeda April Castañeda
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has named April Castañeda as director of human resources. She will lead a team of 70 professionals and direct the laboratory’s compensation and benefits, talent acquisition and university recruiting, diversity, leadership and staff development, labor relations and other key HR functions.
Angie Demchenko Angie Demchenko
Multistate cannabis operator Cresco Labs Inc. named Angie Demchenko as its first chief people officer. Demchenko will be responsible for performance management, recruitment, compensation and employee benefits. She most recently served as vice president, head of human resources for shopping mall operator Starwood Retail Partners.
moves
Angela Persaud Angela Persaud
G/O Media named Angela Persaud as senior vice president head of talent. Persaud will focus on the company’s culture, including the core values of diversity and inclusion as well as lead recruitment and retention activities. Persaud also will take a leadership role on union and general team member relations. She will report to CEO Jim Spanfeller.
Peggy Rubenzer Peggy Rubenzer
Restaurant brand True Food Kitchen named Peggy Rubenzer as chief people officer to lead the brand’s human resources and training function. Rubenzer will be responsible for developing and implementing people strategies. She will report to CEO Christine Barone. She began her HR career in 1989 with Southwest Airlines.
Kelli Spence Kelli Spence
GameWorks Inc., named Kelli Spence as vice president, people and culture. Spence was promoted after spending two years as senior director, people and culture. She now will be focused on initiatives centered around enhancing the employee experience, from identifying talent and recruiting through retention and creating career paths for employees as well as ensuring a fun and rewarding culture.
To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com.
Include People Moves in the subject line.
PEOPLE moves
PEOPLE moves
PEOPLE
moves
Dennis Berger
Dennis Berger
Construction company Suffolk named Dennis Berger as chief culture officer. Berger will oversee Suffolk’s people and culture team and will be responsible for creating a top employee experience across the entire employee life cycle. Berger has more than 30 years of experience across all facets of HR and people management, including the last 14 years as chief human resources officer.
April Castañeda
April Castañeda
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has named April Castañeda as director of human resources. She will lead a team of 70 professionals and direct the laboratory’s compensation and benefits, talent acquisition and university recruiting, diversity, leadership and staff development, labor relations and other key HR functions.
Angie Demchenko
Angie Demchenko
Multistate cannabis operator Cresco Labs Inc. named Angie Demchenko as its first chief people officer. Demchenko will be responsible for performance management, recruitment, compensation and employee benefits. She most recently served as vice president, head of human resources for shopping mall operator Starwood Retail Partners.
Angela Persaud
Angela Persaud
G/O Media named Angela Persaud as senior vice president head of talent. Persaud will focus on the company’s culture, including the core values of diversity and inclusion as well as lead recruitment and retention activities. Persaud also will take a leadership role on union and general team member relations. She will report to CEO Jim Spanfeller.
Peggy Rubenzer
Peggy Rubenzer
Restaurant brand True Food Kitchen named Peggy Rubenzer as chief people officer to lead the brand’s human resources and training function. Rubenzer will be responsible for developing and implementing people strategies. She will report to CEO Christine Barone. She began her HR career in 1989 with Southwest Airlines.
Kelli Spence
Kelli Spence
GameWorks Inc., named Kelli Spence as vice president, people and culture. Spence was promoted after spending two years as senior director, people and culture. She now will be focused on initiatives centered around enhancing the employee experience, from identifying talent and recruiting through retention and creating career paths for employees as well as ensuring a fun and rewarding culture.
To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com.
Include People Moves in the subject line.
Workforce May/June 2019 - By the Numbers

Trending

Michael Ventura, CEO

Rethinking Our Thinking With Empathy

By Francesca Mathewes
Empathy is becoming a vital skill in the workplace, says Michael Ventura, CEO and founder of empathic design firm Sub Rosa. In his book, “Applied Empathy,” Ventura unpacks what a career grounded in human experiences and creativity has taught him about empathy and offers this knowledge to new entrepreneurs and executives.

Workforce: How do you define empathy? What does empathy mean to you?

Michael Ventura: Empathy overall has three subsets. Two out of three types of empathy [effective empathy and somatic empathy] are, in the business and leadership capacity, actually more troublesome than helpful. The third iteration is cognitive empathy. Cognitive empathy is about training the muscle of perspective-taking. That’s about learning how to stand in the shoes of someone else and see the world from their perspective. That deep understanding yields greater insight about this person and what they care about. Our work is grounded in the premise of cognitive empathy. We call it applied empathy, because empathy unto itself is passive.

Trending

LGBTQ+ Push
By Francesca Mathewes
M

ore than 200 companies in the U.S. and across the globe are leading a new push for the expansion of LGBTQ+ rights in the workplace.

Companies including Nike, Bank of America and Pfizer — the most to ever sign a business brief in an LGTBQ+ nondiscrimination case — submitted a “friend of the court” brief to the U.S. Supreme Court. The brief seeks to include sexual orientation and gender identity in Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which “prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin.”

Brian Turoff, litigator and head of law firm Manatt, Phelps and Phillips’ New York employment and labor practice, explained the primary argument supporting the brief. When companies discriminate against someone based on their sexual orientation, in turn, they’re discriminating against them on the basis of sex, per the way that existing legislation construes the word “sex.”

Trending

Workforce's Work in Progress author Kris Dunn.
Balancing the 3 Types of Work-Life Balance

By Kris Dunn | Work in Progress

I

did a candidate interview for an open position recently — during vacation on the beach.

Go ahead and fire up the comments about how my priorities are out of whack. About how I need to take care of myself.

I provide this nugget as a visual to the following reality. There are three types of work-life balance in the world. Two you can choose, one you must earn. All come with a cost. As an HR/talent leader, you should have a point of view on each because odds are they all exist to some extent in your company, but one probably defines your culture.

Let’s break down the types of work-life balance you must choose from:

1. You have zero work-life balance and zero flexibility. Not only are you working long hours but you’re also expected to be present in the office on the organization’s terms, not your own. You have zero flexibility about when you can leave and you have your smartphone next to your pillow at night.

For Your Benefit

Support Grows Among Businesses for Reproductive Rights
Focus has shifted to maximizing employees’ investment opportunities.
By Andie Burjek
M

ost women find a clear connection between reproductive freedom and success in the workplace.

Some 70 percent of people find that reproductive freedom — defined by the World Health Organization as the basic right of all couples and individuals to select the number, spacing and timing of their children and the right to attain the highest standard of sexual and reproductive health — is crucial to women’s empowerment and equality, according to a new study. Meanwhile, 64 percent believe it is crucial for women’s economic stability, the study notes.

“The Business Case for Supporting Reproductive Rights,” a 2019 research from Harris Poll and the National Abortion and Reproductive Rights Action League, a nonprofit that advocates for reproductive rights, found that 80 percent of adults believe that reproductive freedom is a human right and 70 percent of employees want abortion to be safe and legal.

For Your Benefit

Preemie Wellness Tools
March of Dimes relaunches program.
By Rita Pyrillis
M

any employers strive to support pregnant workers, yet the rate of premature births and maternal deaths is on the rise and the infant-mortality rate in the United States is among the highest in the world.

This has led the March of Dimes to revamp a workplace wellness program aimed at supporting mothers during and after pregnancy.

Healthy Babies, Healthy Business is an online platform that provides information on various stages of pregnancy or preconception, and postpartum care, through classes, webinars, articles, videos, games, challenges and other tools. Initially launched in 2007, the nonprofit organization that works to improve the health of mothers and babies added interactive learning features to the platform, but another impetus behind the re-launch was to help women at a time when pregnancy discrimination is increasing and infant mortality remains high.

Darlene Slaughter
Darlene Slaughter

For Your Benefit

HR Urged to Create Investors
Saving employees from themselves is a change in thought.
By Patty Kujawa
Saving employees from themselves is a change in thought.
P

articipants who think they need $1.7 million to be comfortable in retirement may not be saving enough to hit that mark, a new survey from Schwab Retirement Plan Services found.

The online survey of 1,000 401(k) participants showed the average respondent thought they would need to save $1.7 million for retirement. The same report also showed the average participant contributed less than $9,000 to their 401(k) in 2018.

The fact that people are thinking about how much they will need in retirement is good progress, said Nathan Voris, managing director of business strategies for Schwab. While Voris said he was surprised by how good the $1.7 million mark was, some of the improvements to 401(k)s like automatic features are creating a bit of a backlash.

For Your Benefit

Experts: 70 Is the Golden Age to Max Out SS Benefits
Lack of proper retirement planning leads many to claim their Social Security benefit suboptimally.
By Patty Kujawa
B

ecky Beach admits she doesn’t know much about Social Security, but she definitely thinks it won’t be around when she needs it. That’s why the 40-year-old lifestyle blogger plans to start taking the benefit when she turns 62.

“I plan to take it out as early as I can,” Beach said from her home in Arlington, Texas. “I don’t really know that much about Social Security, but I hear it’s going to go away.”

Lots of people like Beach think similarly. In fact, only 4 percent of retirees wait until the optimal age of 70 to take their Social Security benefit, a new study by robo-adviser United Income said. Retirees lose out on $3.4 trillion in possible income, which on average is $111,000 per household, because they don’t take Social Security at the best point in their lifetime.

For Your Benefit

Jennifer Benz
Benefits Can Help Ward Off Loneliness

By Jennifer Benz | Benefits Beat

I

t’s impossible to avoid the headlines about loneliness and its consequences.

Being lonely hurts our health. It spans generations. And it’s a topic of discussion at HR conferences and in many of the publications you read.

“Loneliness is the new smoking,” one headline announced after a couple of big surveys were released last year. Cigna’s chief medical officer confirmed it, saying, “Loneliness has the same impact on mortality as smoking 15 cigarettes a day, making it even more dangerous than obesity.”

Yikes! So many people are lonely that it’s reaching public health crisis proportions. The 2018 study by The Economist and Kaiser Family Foundation found that 22 percent of Americans and 23 percent of folks in the U.K. always or often feel lonely, lack companionship or feel left out or isolated.

Legal

Successful Harassment Prevention Programs in the #MeToo Era
10 points to keep in mind regardless of the size of your company or industry.
By Michael S. Cohen
F

rom the instant I first saw the hashtag #MeToo on Twitter, I had a sense that my professional life might get busy to a degree I had never experienced.

I am an employment lawyer who has spent the better part of the past decade building a practice, the centerpiece of which has been conducting human resources and employment law trainings for organizations of all kinds. The importance of harassment prevention was going to be at the forefront not only for HR professionals (a place it had existed for some time), but finally also for executives and directors.

Legal Briefings

ARBITRATION CLAUSES CAN CAUSE A RIFT
In Latif v. Morgan Stanley & Co., plaintiff Mahmoud Latif complained to defendant Morgan Stanley’s HR department about his co-workers’ inappropriate comments regarding his sexual orientation and religion, inappropriate touching and sexual advances. Latif also complained of a female supervisor sexually assaulting him. Morgan Stanley terminated him one year after he first complained. Latif brought suit in federal court alleging discrimination, hostile work environment and retaliation in violation of Title VII. Morgan Stanley moved to compel arbitration under Latif’s employment agreement. In response, Latif argued the agreement was not enforceable as to his sexual harassment claims in light of a recently adopted New York law. The New York law, N.Y. C.P.L.R. § 7515, prohibits employers from requiring employees to arbitrate claims of sexual harassment, except where inconsistent with federal law. The court found the New York law was inconsistent with federal law — specifically, the Federal Arbitration Act (the FAA), which states that arbitration clauses shall be valid, irrevocable, and enforceable, unless grounds exist for the revocation of any contract. Similar to AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion, where the Supreme Court held the FAA preempts state laws prohibiting waivers of class-wide arbitration, this court found that the FAA preempted the New York law because it attempted to prohibit arbitration of a particular type of claim. Latif v. Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 107020.

Legal

The Practical Employer author, Jon Hyman.
Beware ‘Religious Exemption’ Plan

Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer

Beware ‘Religious Exemption’ Plan
Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer
W

arning: This month’s column is not for everyone. If, however, you are offended by what I am about to say, then this is specifically for you.

In August, the Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, the federal agency that regulates and governs federal contractors and subcontractors, proposed regulations to clarify the scope and application of the religious exemption contained in section 204(c) of Executive Order 11246.

By way of background, Executive Order 11246, signed by President Lyndon Johnson in September 1965, “prohibits federal contractors and federally assisted construction contractors and subcontractors, who do over $10,000 in Government business in one year from discriminating in employment decisions on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.” It’s been amended over the years, including its 2014 addition of LGBTQ protections to the list of prohibited discrimination.

Workplace Focus: HR's Healing Resources
Mani Mueller is one of the millions of Americans who has cared for an elderly parent or children while working a full-time job.
Facing the Caregiving Crisis
Your employees care — care for an elderly parent, care for an ailing spouse, care for a child with special needs. How much do employers care about their employee caregiver population? That depends.
By Rita Pyrillis
W

hen Mani Mueller landed a plum job at a biotech firm in Wisconsin in 2013 she brought her parents from Pennsylvania to help care for her two young daughters while she found her footing at work. 

The timing was perfect. Her mother had just retired and her father, who suffered from Parkinson’s disease, was doing well and looked forward to spending time with his granddaughters. But what promised to be a dream scenario fell apart within a few months as her father’s condition declined and her mom couldn’t keep up with his care.

Parkinson’s is a progressive nervous system disorder that affects movement, and her father began falling frequently, requiring constant supervision. Soon, Mueller was tackling not only the demands of a new job, but also working a second shift as her father’s primary caregiver and power of attorney, shuttling him to doctor’s appointments, researching treatments, and learning to navigate the Medicare and Medicaid systems. Since her father, a Laotian immigrant, spoke little English she also became his translator.

At 37, Mueller had joined the ranks of 44 million adults in the United States who provide unpaid care for a loved one who needs support, according to AARP. She also became a member of the “sandwich generation,” caring for both a parent and children. Like many caregivers in the workplace, she never told her employer for fear of damaging her career. Instead, she used her vacation and personal days to meet the demands of caregiving.

Workplace Focus: HR's Healing Resources
Mani Mueller is one of the millions of Americans who has cared for an elderly parent or children while working a full-time job.
Facing the Caregiving Crisis
Your employees care — care for an elderly parent, care for an ailing spouse, care for a child with special needs. How much do employers care about their employee caregiver population? That depends.
By Mary-Clare Race
W

hen Mani Mueller landed a plum job at a biotech firm in Wisconsin in 2013 she brought her parents from Pennsylvania to help care for her two young daughters while she found her footing at work. 

The timing was perfect. Her mother had just retired and her father, who suffered from Parkinson’s disease, was doing well and looked forward to spending time with his granddaughters. But what promised to be a dream scenario fell apart within a few months as her father’s condition declined and her mom couldn’t keep up with his care.

Parkinson’s is a progressive nervous system disorder that affects movement, and her father began falling frequently, requiring constant supervision. Soon, Mueller was tackling not only the demands of a new job, but also working a second shift as her father’s primary caregiver and power of attorney, shuttling him to doctor’s appointments, researching treatments, and learning to navigate the Medicare and Medicaid systems. Since her father, a Laotian immigrant, spoke little English she also became his translator.

At 37, Mueller had joined the ranks of 44 million adults in the United States who provide unpaid care for a loved one who needs support, according to AARP. She also became a member of the “sandwich generation,” caring for both a parent and children. Like many caregivers in the workplace, she never told her employer for fear of damaging her career. Instead, she used her vacation and personal days to meet the demands of caregiving.

In January 2018, five years after she placed her father in a nursing home, her company, Promega, introduced a caregiver leave benefit that provides employees with an additional two weeks of paid time off a year to care for a sick parent, spouse or child, or to welcome a new child. But even then Mueller was reluctant to come forward.

“I didn’t want to advertise that I was dealing with all of this or put on paper that my dad has this condition and my kids have that condition,” said Mueller, now 43 and a manager in supplier quality at Fitchburg, Wisconsin-based Promega. “I keep everything to myself. I thought sharing this information would negatively impact my career. I’m very quiet and private, but internally, I thought ‘How much more can I deal with?’ I was exhausted and stressed out.”

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SUPPORT YOUR EMPLOYEES AND THEIR FAMILIES
Provide your employees with the information they need before, during and after pregnancy.
THE COST OF PREMATURE BIRTH

March of Dimes is a champion for families, fighting for the health of all moms and babies in communities like yours and across the country. Premature birth and its complications are the largest contributors to infant death in the United States and globally. In addition to the emotional toll it takes on families, the societal cost of premature birth is more than $26 billon every year. And the average NICU stay can cost 12 times as much as a routine delivery ($54,000 vs $4,500). The bottom line is that premature birth costs individual companies thousands of dollars in absenteeism and lost productivity. Expenses for childbirth and newborn care also make up a large part of what employers pay in health insurance costs.

Sponsored Content
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Staying Ahead of Disruption with Workforce Sensing.
By Daniel Roddy (Human Capital Research and Sensing as a Service Leader with Bersin™, Deloitte Consulting LLP ) and Chris Havrilla (HR Technology & Solution Provider Research Leader with Bersin™, Deloitte Consulting LLP)

Plug the word “disruption” into Google Trends and you’ll get a jagged line tracking 15 years of peaks and plunges in search frequency. But for all the short-term variation in the chart, the long-term trend is steadily rising: there are nearly three times as many “disruption” searches today as there were in 2004.

The steady rise in searches reflects a reality that won’t surprise most leaders. They face a host of disruptions—social, demographic, environmental, economic, technological, and geopolitical. Not only is it their job to make sure that their companies don’t get blindsided by these breakpoints in the status quo, but they also must be able to respond to them quickly and agilely in order to transform these disruptions into competitive advantage.

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Transformational Leadership: It’s Not What You Think
Don’t be fooled by the name; transformational leadership is charismatic leadership with a fancy title
By Scott Gregory

The idea of transformational leadership sounds good when taken at face value. A transformational leader is someone who instills pride, respect and trust in its followers. They inspire and motivate people beyond expectations, sparking innovation and change. And, if you look up “transformation” in the dictionary, you will see it defined as “a thorough or dramatic change in form or appearance.” So, what organization wouldn’t want to introduce some form of transformational leadership to respond to the disruption caused by the current digital revolution?

Although transformational leadership seems like a good idea in theory, it is nothing more than charismatic leadership with a different and more appealing name. A recent study published by the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology shows that there is plenty to dislike about charismatic leadership. In fact, there is little evidence to show that there is a strong correlation between charisma and effective leadership. So, because charismatic leadership and transformational leadership are essentially the same thing, it’s important to understand how this style of leadership has been so widely adopted across the globe.

The Mental Health Parity Challenge
Benefits programs don’t necessarily treat physical and mental health care equally. With more focus on workplace mental health, that may be slowly changing.
By Andie Burjek
I

t’s been a decade since the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act went into effect, with the goal that insurers and health plans offer mental health and substance abuse benefits comparable to coverage of medical and surgical care.

Despite progress made since the law’s passage, some barriers to equality still exist. As vital as behavioral health care is for people with substance abuse and mental health disorders, unlike their physical health needs, employees with employer-sponsored coverage may face challenges in accessing and affording quality mental health care coverage.

The current environment sees employers, employees, the government and individuals spending more money on behavioral health than ever before, but the results just aren’t there, said Henry Harbin, a psychiatrist with over 40 years’ experience in the behavioral health field.

The Mental Health Parity Challenge
Benefits programs don’t necessarily treat physical and mental health care equally. With more focus on workplace mental health, that may be slowly changing.
By Andie Burjek
I

t’s been a decade since the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act went into effect, with the goal that insurers and health plans offer mental health and substance abuse benefits comparable to coverage of medical and surgical care.

Despite progress made since the law’s passage, some barriers to equality still exist. As vital as behavioral health care is for people with substance abuse and mental health disorders, unlike their physical health needs, employees with employer-sponsored coverage may face challenges in accessing and affording quality mental health care coverage.

The current environment sees employers, employees, the government and individuals spending more money on behavioral health than ever before, but the results just aren’t there, said Henry Harbin, a psychiatrist with over 40 years’ experience in the behavioral health field.

Harbin, whose experience includes senior positions at public and private health organizations, said that while fatality rates for many medical issues are decreasing, fatality rates from suicide and opioid overdoses — two major issues in behavioral health — are increasing. Between 2004 and 2014, the death rate for heart disease decreased by 16 percent and for stroke by 19 percent. In the same span, the death rate climbed by 17 percent for suicide and over 200 percent for opioids, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For employers, genuinely caring about their employees’ mental health issues is a good start, but providing quality coverage is important as well. Behavioral issues among employees are prevalent. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 1 in 5 adults in the United States have a mental health disorder. Meanwhile, 1 in 22 adults have a serious mental illness like schizophrenia, major depression or bipolar disorder, the study noted.

Roll out of bed whenever, dress as you like — the image of the remote worker is one who is healthy and happy, right? Well, not necessarily.
By Carol Brzozowski
B

arbara Fisher recalled a time one of her remote workers traveled to Hawaii yet called in to four meetings over two days.

“I asked, ‘How are you recharging? Why did you even take your computer?’ As a remote worker, it’s an extension of what she does,” said Fisher, chief operating and people officer for digital health company Aduro Inc. who previously was a vice president for Intel Corp. working in human relations and talent management.

“The reality is that weighs on you. You’re never able to refuel.”

Remote work has become the new normal for companies responding to workers’ desire for flexibility. In its “State of the American Workplace” report, Gallup polling found 43 percent of employees worked remotely in 2016 compared to 39 percent in 2012.

In its 2019 “Employee Benefits” report on leave and flexible working released in June, the Society for Human Resource Management noted that remote work continues to rise in popularity as a benefit. Telecommuting of all types is increasing as a result. Part-time telecommuting — now offered by more than 40 percent of organizations — is up 5 percent from 2018 and demonstrated the greatest increase.

Ad-hoc telecommuting is offered by 69 percent of organizations while full-time telecommuting is offered by more than one-quarter of organizations, SHRM reports.

“From a remote worker’s perspective, some of the positive aspects are flexible job schedules, work-life balance and the freedom to work from almost anywhere,” said Tina Garrell, director of the annual HR Florida Conference for the HR Florida State Council, a SHRM affiliate.

Out of Sight
Roll out of bed whenever, dress as you like — the image of the remote worker is one who is healthy and happy, right? Well, not necessarily.
By Carol Brzozowski
B

arbara Fisher recalled a time one of her remote workers traveled to Hawaii yet called in to four meetings over two days.

“I asked, ‘How are you recharging? Why did you even take your computer?’ As a remote worker, it’s an extension of what she does,” said Fisher, chief operating and people officer for digital health company Aduro Inc. who previously was a vice president for Intel Corp. working in human relations and talent management.

“The reality is that weighs on you. You’re never able to refuel.”

Remote work has become the new normal for companies responding to workers’ desire for flexibility. In its “State of the American Workplace” report, Gallup polling found 43 percent of employees worked remotely in 2016 compared to 39 percent in 2012.

In its 2019 “Employee Benefits” report on leave and flexible working released in June, the Society for Human Resource Management noted that remote work continues to rise in popularity as a benefit. Telecommuting of all types is increasing as a result. Part-time telecommuting — now offered by more than 40 percent of organizations — is up 5 percent from 2018 and demonstrated the greatest increase.

Ad-hoc telecommuting is offered by 69 percent of organizations while full-time telecommuting is offered by more than one-quarter of organizations, SHRM reports.

“From a remote worker’s perspective, some of the positive aspects are flexible job schedules, work-life balance and the freedom to work from almost anywhere,” said Tina Garrell, director of the annual HR Florida Conference for the HR Florida State Council, a SHRM affiliate.

For companies, it means extending a footprint beyond its headquarters, saving on office space costs and keeping employees happy.

“But employers are sometimes faced with different challenges arising with their remote workforce, such as the health and well-being of those employees who do not come to the office every day,” said Garrell.

Studies show remote workers struggle with loneliness, isolation, an inability to unplug and ongoing distractions.

“Global Work Connectivity,” a recent study commissioned by Virgin Pulse and HR advisory and research firm Future Workplace, concludes many remote workers feel isolated.

Maybe You’re Aware …
Self-Awareness Is in Short Supply
Despite many people’s belief in their self-awareness, there’s a lack of it. Follow these steps to assess, build and improve it throughout your organization.
By John Hackston
R

esearch indicates that more self-aware individuals understand others better, enabling them to lead more effectively.

The research on self-awareness by my organization, the Myers-Briggs Co., shows that most people believe they are self-aware. In fact, 82 percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the statement “I have a great deal of self-awareness.”

Despite these high levels of self-reported self-awareness, a study by The Eurich Group shows that the quality of self-awareness is actually in short supply. This wasn’t a surprise. In our research, most participants thought that they were more self-aware than most people they knew (which is, of course, impossible; everyone can’t be more self-aware than everyone else).

There are a number of reasons to believe that greater general levels of self-awareness among individuals within organizations lead to positive business outcomes. Studies such as those by Bass and Yammarino, Atwater and Yamamarino, and Church showed that people with more accurate self-conception tended to perform better.

The relationship between self-awareness and flexibility is demonstrated by a study of the Royal Navy, which found that more self-aware leaders were better able to tailor their leadership style to the needs of a given situation. Better employee performance plus more agile leadership typically leads to a better bottom line.

There’s also reason to believe that self-awareness might influence retention. My team at Myers-Briggs recently researched workplace well-being with over 10,000 global respondents and found that individuals with a higher level of well-being — which can stem from self-awareness — had significantly higher levels of job satisfaction, felt much more emotionally attached to their organization, and were significantly less likely to look for a new job. They were also much more likely to be good organizational citizens being helpful to their co-workers, conscientious and more willing to go the extra mile.

Maybe You’re Aware …
Self-Awareness Is in Short Supply
Despite many people’s belief in their self-awareness, there’s a lack of it. Follow these steps to assess, build and improve it throughout your organization.
By John Hackston
R

esearch indicates that more self-aware individuals understand others better, enabling them to lead more effectively.

The research on self-awareness by my organization, the Myers-Briggs Co., shows that most people believe they are self-aware. In fact, 82 percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the statement “I have a great deal of self-awareness.”

Despite these high levels of self-reported self-awareness, a study by The Eurich Group shows that the quality of self-awareness is actually in short supply. This wasn’t a surprise. In our research, most participants thought that they were more self-aware than most people they knew (which is, of course, impossible; everyone can’t be more self-aware than everyone else).

There are a number of reasons to believe that greater general levels of self-awareness among individuals within organizations lead to positive business outcomes. Studies such as those by Bass and Yammarino, Atwater and Yamamarino, and Church showed that people with more accurate self-conception tended to perform better.

The relationship between self-awareness and flexibility is demonstrated by a study of the Royal Navy, which found that more self-aware leaders were better able to tailor their leadership style to the needs of a given situation. Better employee performance plus more agile leadership typically leads to a better bottom line.

There’s also reason to believe that self-awareness might influence retention. My team at Myers-Briggs recently researched workplace well-being with over 10,000 global respondents and found that individuals with a higher level of well-being — which can stem from self-awareness — had significantly higher levels of job satisfaction, felt much more emotionally attached to their organization, and were significantly less likely to look for a new job. They were also much more likely to be good organizational citizens being helpful to their co-workers, conscientious and more willing to go the extra mile.

What Is Self-Awareness and How Does It Help?
According to the Oxford English Dictionary self-awareness is, “Conscious knowledge of one’s own character and feelings.”

Researcher Anna Sutton further elaborates on this to describe it as, “The extent to which people are consciously aware of their interactions or relationships with others and of their internal states.”

Think about a time you took your car in for a tune-up. Nothing major was fixed, but afterward it drove like a dream. Similarly, increasing your self-awareness can help you perform better — by discovering how you operate you begin to understand how to adjust your behaviors for better results.

HR Management Systems

Artificial Intelligence Falls Flat
Human resources leaders are less than impressed with their cloud-based HR systems. They may be partly to blame.
By Sarah Fister Gale
H

uman resources leaders have an idea that artificial intelligence and machine learning tools are going to transform the way they use their HR management systems. They are right, in theory.

For years HRMS vendors have been talking about the promise of AI and machine learning and how these tools will soon behave more like Netflix and Amazon, and customers are excited. “They want an individualized experience based on who they are, what they prefer, and what people in similar roles have done,” said David Ludlow, group vice president of SAP SuccessFactors.

They also want predictive analytics that will help HR leaders attract and retain a more effective and sustainable workforce, said Chris Havrilla, vice president of HR technology and solutions provider strategies at Bersin, Deloitte Consulting LLP. But so far their expectations haven’t been met.

Staffing Providers

Technology and the Talent Shortage
How staffing agencies are adapting to the supply and demand gap.
By Sarah Fister Gale
L

ittle seems to have changed in the past year for the staffing industry. There is still more demand for talent than there is supply, the gap continues to widen, and there is no end to both complex issue in sight.

“If anything, the skills shortage is having a dampening effect on the industry, because it’s even more extreme,” said Barry Asin, president of Staffing Industry Analysts headquartered in Mountain View, California. Clients are seeking out their services more than ever but they just can’t fill the roles fast enough.

Yet there is a subtle difference from last year as staffing agencies make some innovative changes to adapt to the new normal. The biggest investments are around agency-hosted reskilling programs to fill a variety of talent needs. At the high end, agencies like Adecco are creating or acquiring coding bootcamps to train promising candidates for hard-to-fill STEM roles — in 2018 Adecco acquired digital retraining firm General Assembly for $412 million.

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Last Word

Rick Bell

Workforce's Last Word author, Rick Bell.
Training for an Unnatural Disaster
Training for an Unnatural Disaster
A

s a kid growing up in the Midwest we practiced tornado drills. After moving to the West Coast it was drop, cover and hold while prepping for an earthquake.

Natural disasters like tornadoes and earthquakes strike with little warning. Sadly, the same is true when a weapon-​toting menace is intent on killing a lot of people.

I experienced my first active-shooter drill in our office building a few weeks back.

It wasn’t unlike the fire drill we practice once a year — alarms flash overhead, we all get up from our desks and move to a designated location for our safety.

September/October 2019 | Volume 98, Issue 5

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WORKFORCE EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Arie Ball, Vice President, Sourcing and Talent Acquisition, Sodexo
Angela Bailey, Associate Director and Chief Human Capital Officer, U.S. Office of Personnel Management
Kris Dunn, Chief Human Resources Officer, Kinetix, and Founder, Fistful of Talent and HR Capitalist
Curtis Gray, Senior Vice President, Human Resources and Administration, BAE Systems
Jil Greene, Vice President, Human Resources and Community Relations, Harrah’s New Orleans
Ted Hoff, Human Resources Vice President, Global Sales and Sales Incentives, IBM
Tracy Kofski, Vice President, Compensation and Benefits, General Mills
Jon Hyman, Partner, Meyers, Roman, Friedberg & Lewis
Jim McDermid, Vice President, Human Resources, Cardiac and Vascular Group, Medtronic
Randall Moon, Vice President, International HR, Benefits and HRIS, Lowe’s Cos.
Dan Satterthwaite, Head of Human Resources, DreamWorks
Dave Ulrich, Professor, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan

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