November/December 2019

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s intern program is a poster child for success.
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s intern program is a poster child for success.
November/December 2019
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s intern program is a poster child for success.
November/December 2019

| From Our Editors

Mike Prokopeak, Editor in Chief
For many, work is a source of necessary income. It’s also what gives the day structure and purpose. Unfortunately, all too often it’s also a never-ending journey through and around a series of organizational barriers and procedural hoops. The way we do work gets in the way of getting the job done.

The rise of employee experience software and apps to make that even just a little bit better is welcome. But there’s a lurking problem for HR. One HR executive told me his team navigates a dozen software systems a day, most of which don’t share nicely.

The employee experience for HR? Not so fun, it turns out.

AI and sophisticated software and apps promise to make work less clunky for employees — to get processes out of the way and let them do more of what they’re good at. Let’s make that a priority for the HR department, too.

—Mike Prokopeak,
Editor in Chief

The workplace has changed a lot since 1922. That year The Journal of Personnel Research debuted, rebranded later as Personnel Journal and finally Workforce. Now in our 97th year, we take a look back at what was on the minds of past generations of people managers.

All About Ethics, March 2004
It was 15 years ago when Workforce Management introduced a new Optimas Award category.

Ethical Practice (which has since morphed into Corporate Citizenship as an Optimas category) became a thing that year. Considering that the corporate landscape had been wracked by massive scandals the previous three years involving Enron, Worldcom and Freddie Mac, to name just a few, celebrating companies that did business the right way came none too soon. The winner of that first Optimas Award for Ethical Practice was aerospace giant Lockheed Martin. Ron Covais, then a VP of business development, became something of a celebrity after rejecting “an inappropriate request for payment” (i.e., a bribe) from a foreign customer and immediately withdrew his company from bidding on a project, helping to highlight Lockheed’s commitment to ethical standards.

A separate story headlined “Clean Slate” told of the redemption of another corporate bad boy. Tyco International suffered a scandalous affair but began a revival with the help of the new senior VP of HR, Laurie Siegel, who was described as a “48-year-old straight arrow,” was tasked with establishing a corporate-governance and compensation systems and controls.

Unfortunately one Optimas winner that year was destined for a date with corporate scandal. Wachovia was the Optimas winner for Service. Four years later it was embroiled in the subprime mortgage meltdown. If only they had paid attention to Lockheed’s ethics.

Rick Bell

 

It was 15 years ago when Workforce Management introduced a new Optimas Award category.

Ethical Practice (which has since morphed into Corporate Citizenship as an Optimas category) became a thing that year. Considering that the corporate landscape had been wracked by massive scandals the previous three years involving Enron, Worldcom and Freddie Mac, to name just a few, celebrating companies that did business the right way came none too soon. The winner of that first Optimas Award for Ethical Practice was aerospace giant Lockheed Martin. Ron Covais, then a VP of business development, became something of a celebrity after rejecting “an inappropriate request for payment” (i.e., a bribe) from a foreign customer and immediately withdrew his company from bidding on a project, helping to highlight Lockheed’s commitment to ethical standards.

A separate story headlined “Clean Slate” told of the redemption of another corporate bad boy. Tyco International suffered a scandalous affair but began a revival with the help of the new senior VP of HR, Laurie Siegel, who was described as a “48-year-old straight arrow,” was tasked with establishing a corporate-governance and compensation systems and controls.

Unfortunately one Optimas winner that year was destined for a date with corporate scandal. Wachovia was the Optimas winner for Service. Four years later it was embroiled in the subprime mortgage meltdown. If only they had paid attention to Lockheed’s ethics.

Rick Bell

Tech Shortages and the Space Race February 1963
Frenzy surrounding tech worker shortages isn’t something unique to modern-day Silicon Valley. During the 1960s, President John F. Kennedy stressed that “one of the most critical problems facing this nation” was the inadequate amount of talent with tech skills, according to the 1963 article “Use of Scientific and Engineering Brainpower During This Decade.”

Author William G. Torpey, a consultant to the federal government’s Office of Emergency Planning, laid out eight different national and global trends that impacted the U.S.’ increased need for tech talent. These trends included the country’s defense buildup, recent United Nations programs and the manpower needs of the Peace Corps. Most notably, however, Torpey stressed the role tech talent would play in placing a man on the moon by the end of the decade. A NASA official had recently said that the organization was actively recruiting 2,000 scientists and engineers at the time.

This issue of Personnel Journal also included “The Employee Bill of Rights,” which argued that employees have the right to know a detailed job description of their position and the minimum, midpoint and maximum salaries for their job. “The major reason for this lack of knowledge is many companies are still operating under the mistaken idea that giving salary information is dangerous,” the article stated.

Andie Burjek

Capping A Distinguished Decade image
Capping A Distinguished Decade image

On The Cover

2019 Optimas Awards

Workforce announces the Optimas Gold, Silver and Bronze winners in this, the 29th anniversary of the Optimas Awards. This year, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory took home top honors.

Cover Photo by Brittni Kiick
Workforce Optimas Awards 2019 logo
Workforce Optimas Awards 2019 logo

Sector Report

48

RELOCATION

Internal mobility is the hot new employee engagement tool giving relocation vendors a chance for reinvention.

50

FINANCIAL WELLNESS

Financial issues among the employee population is causing some to experience plan fatigue.

FEATURES

22

Diversity Schooling

A diverse talent pipeline should be filling the C-suite. Based on research from Workforce’s research arm, it’s not.

28

ON THE JOB (BOARD)

Some have tried to bury the traditional job board for several years. Put away the shovel for now.

34

Science Flair

From high-tech VR to a low-tech poster program, HR ends the ‘teens’ with a series of noteworthy initiatives.

Diversity Schooling image
On the Job (Board) image
On the Job (Board) image

On The Web

speak up!

The Workforce online community provides you with virtual meeting places to chat about issues and trends affecting you and your workplace.
 

Join the group:
workforce.com/linkedingroup

Columns

4

your force

The Way We Do Work Gets in the Way of Getting the Job Done.

13

WORK IN PROGRESS

An Assist in the Search for Your First HR Leader.

17

Benefits beat

Easing the Access to Benefits Information.

20

THE PRACTICAL EMPLOYER

Ban the Box Laws Hurt Minority Candidates.

54

THE LAST WORD

Endorsing a Workplace Nip and Tuck.

For Your Benefit

14

E-CIGS UNDER FIRE

Fresh health concerns form a smokescreen surrounding vaping in the workplace.

15

EMOTIONAL MONITOR

Emerging technologies help employees assess the impact of their emotional state on performance.

15

HOORAY FOR HRAs

New tool provides workers with pretax dollars in the individual market instead of a group plan.

16

GIFT-WRAPPED Paid Time Off

It doesn’t hurt to give employees some end-of-year holiday cheer with extended paid time off.

Trending

10

BOOM GOES HR TECH

HR tech funding will reach $5 billion in 2019.

11

PEOPLE MOVES AND BY THE NUMBERS

Sodexo names Payne CHRO; reviewing the managers.

12

DEFINING NINCOMPOOPERY

Author John R. Brandt helps correct workplace ineptitude.

12

Google Hire fired

Google announced it was officially shutting down Google Hire.

Legal

18

AVOIDING HARASSMENT

Taking a look at recently implemented laws in six states.

19

LEGAL BRIEFINGS

Collective action; Bonus pay.

Trending

VC Funding Frenzy Over HR Technology on Record Pace
Despite HR tech investments predicted to reach $5 billion in 2019, change is anything but assured.
By Sarah Fister Gale
I

f you haven’t started your own super-successful HR technology company it’s not too late.

Venture capitalists’ love affair with HR tech firms is on track to break records as they dole out millions of dollars to entrepreneurs who promise to transform the human resources landscape. According to HRWins by LaRocque LLC, venture firms invested $1.448 billion in the second quarter of 2019, and another $964 million in the third quarter, putting the year’s total at $4.18 billion with fourth-quarter results yet to be tallied.

While third-quarter totals show a slight dip, the quarter saw four mega-rounds of at least $100 million, including $200 million to Gusto, the payroll startup for SMBs. “With a quarter left to go, 2019 is surging beyond investments made in 2018,” according to LaRocque.

PEOPLE
Kori S. CarewKori S. Carew
Law firm Seyfarth Shaw LLP has named Kori S. Carew as chief inclusion and diversity officer. In this newly created role, Carew is responsible for advancing Seyfarth’s in clusion and diversity strategy and accelerating its existing portfolio of programs and external partnerships.
Carew previously was director of strategic diversity initiatives at joins from Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP.
Dondi Dix Dondi Dix
Insurance firm Lockton named Dondi Dix as its new senior vice president-chief people officer. In this newly created executive-level position, Dix will focus on strengthening Lockton’s human capital strategy to continue attracting and developing top talent. Dix will also partner with all offices across Lockton to enhance the company’s LocktonLife program.
Stephanie Payne Stephanie Payne
Food-services company Sodexo named Stephanie Payne as chief human resources officer for North America. Payne most recently was the head of human resources, Americas region, for the ABB Group, a Swiss multinational company. Before that she held human resources roles for Eaton Corp. and Visteon. Payne is a graduate of Spelman College in Atlanta and Ohio Northern University, where she received a law degree.
moves
Stevens J. Sainte-Rose Stevens J. Sainte-Rose
Surterra Wellness named Stevens J. Sainte-Rose as chief human resources officer and as a member of its executive leadership team. Sainte-Rose will lead Surterra’s global human resources and be responsible for developing and executing human resources strategy in support of the company’s overall business plan and strategic direction.
Frank Steinert Frank Steinert
Consumer-goods company Henkel named Frank Steinert as senior vice president, head of human resources North America. He also will serve as a member of Henkel’s North American leadership team. Steinert will be based at Henkel’s Consumer Goods North American headquarters in Stamford, Connecticut.
Carlecia Wright Carlecia Wright
Tech startup BiasSync named Carlecia Wright as vice president, business development. Wright will report to CEO and co-founder Michele Ruiz and will be based in Houston. Wright has served as chief diversity officer for the city of Houston and was appointed by the mayor as city department director for the Office of Business Opportunity and served on the Harvey Recovery Executive Team.
To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com.
Include People Moves in the subject line.
PEOPLE moves
PEOPLE moves
PEOPLE
moves
Kori S. Carew Headshot
Kori S. Carew
Law firm Seyfarth Shaw LLP has named Kori S. Carew as chief inclusion and diversity officer. In this newly created role, Carew is responsible for advancing Seyfarth’s in clusion and diversity strategy and accelerating its existing portfolio of programs and external partnerships.
Carew previously was director of strategic diversity initiatives at joins from Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP.
Dondi Dix Headshot
Dondi Dix
Insurance firm Lockton named Dondi Dix as its new senior vice president-chief people officer. In this newly created executive-level position, Dix will focus on strengthening Lockton’s human capital strategy to continue attracting and developing top talent. Dix will also partner with all offices across Lockton to enhance the company’s LocktonLife program.
Stephanie Payne Headshot
Stephanie Payne
Food-services company Sodexo named Stephanie Payne as chief human resources officer for North America. Payne most recently was the head of human resources, Americas region, for the ABB Group, a Swiss multinational company. Before that she held human resources roles for Eaton Corp. and Visteon. Payne is a graduate of Spelman College in Atlanta and Ohio Northern University, where she received a law degree.
Stevens J. Sainte-Rose Headshot
Stevens J. Sainte-Rose
Surterra Wellness named Stevens J. Sainte-Rose as chief human resources officer and as a member of its executive leadership team. Sainte-Rose will lead Surterra’s global human resources and be responsible for developing and executing human resources strategy in support of the company’s overall business plan and strategic direction.
Frank Steinert Headshot
Frank Steinert
Consumer-goods company Henkel named Frank Steinert as senior vice president, head of human resources North America. He also will serve as a member of Henkel’s North American leadership team. Steinert will be based at Henkel’s Consumer Goods North American headquarters in Stamford, Connecticut.
Carlecia Wright Headshot
Carlecia Wright
Tech startup BiasSync named Carlecia Wright as vice president, business development. Wright will report to CEO and co-founder Michele Ruiz and will be based in Houston. Wright has served as chief diversity officer for the city of Houston and was appointed by the mayor as city department director for the Office of Business Opportunity and served on the Harvey Recovery Executive Team.
To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com.
Include People Moves in the subject line.
Workforce November/December 2019 - By the Numbers Image

Trending

John R. Brandt, author
Besting Nincompoopery
By Rick Bell
John R. Brandt is a rarity among leadership experts. Currently the CEO and founder of the MPI Group, Brandt also toiled in the journalistic trenches as the publisher and editor in chief of IndustryWeek. So not only can he speak authoritatively on leadership, he can also write with wit and vision. Brandt’s new book “Nincompoopery: Why Your Customers Hate You — and How to Fix It” blends corporate expertise with an acerbic yet insightful eye. Workforce Editorial Director Rick Bell caught up with Brandt via email.

Workforce: A nincompoop is defined as a foolish or stupid person. Define nincompoopery.

John R. Brandt: We’re all nincompoops at one time or another; just ask your spouse, or if you’re really brave, your kids. But nincompoopery is different: It’s the corporate stupidity that drives customers crazy, and keeps everyone — customers, employees, managers and business owners — from getting what they want. It’s what happens when you expect a service or product or process to work, but it doesn’t — and nobody can seem to fix it, even though everybody knows what’s wrong.

Trending

Google Hire Fired
By Sarah Fister Gale
A

pplicant tracking systems providers breathed a small sigh of relief in September when Google announced it was officially shutting down Google Hire, the cloud-based applicant tracking system that the search-engine giant launched barely two years ago.

It’s a fitting end to a product that was never a good fit for Google’s portfolio of solutions, said Othamar Gama Filho, CEO of recruitment marketing automation platform Talentify. “I was more surprised when they launched it than when they ended it.”

Google Hire promised to simplify the hiring process for recruiters. By utilizing Google’s powerful search capabilities, open API environment and G Suite tools, including Gmail and Google Calendar, recruiters would be able to more easily find and communicate with candidates and schedule interviews. At least that was the pitch.

Trending

Workforce's Work in Progress author Kris Dunn.
How to Hire Your First HR Leader

By Kris Dunn | Work in Progress

S

o, business is good, growth is strong and you’re ready to hire your first HR leader. That’s great news. Congrats!

Now comes the hard part.

This column is not meant to help those looking for their first HR hire, which is generally an individual added by small to medium-sized business when transactional items like payroll and compliance overwhelm an office manager or similar administrative employee with another job to do.

For Your Benefit

New Concerns Form Smokescreen Over Vaping at Work
With more health and safety questions than answers, employers are examining policy options.
By Rita Pyrillis
T

he surging popularity of e-cigarettes and the recent spate of illnesses associated with them have caught public health officials and health care providers by surprise and left many employers wondering whether to allow their use in the workplace and what kind of policies are needed to manage the practice.

An e-cigarette is an electronic device that heats up small amounts of liquid nicotine and other substances into an aerosol that can be inhaled, also known as vaping. E-cigarette use among teenagers has skyrocketed in recent years, but others see vaping as a safe alternative to smoking and a tool to quit, an issue that is up for debate.

For Your Benefit

Hooray for HRAs
A benefit for smaller companies.
By Rita Pyrillis
S

tarting in January 2020 employers will have a new tool to provide workers with pretax dollars for purchasing insurance in the individual health care market instead of offering them a group plan.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Labor and the Department of the Treasury in June issued a new policy that expands the use of health reimbursement arrangements. Previously, HRAs could be used only in combination with an employer-sponsored group health plan. The new individual coverage HRAs, or IHRAs, could be used to pay for out-of-pocket expenses, Medicare premiums or individual policies purchased through or outside the health exchanges formed by the Affordable Care Act.

For Your Benefit

Monitoring Emotions at Work
New tools go above and beyond wearables like watches.
By Carol Brzozowski
W

ith emotional well-being in the workplace, “prevention is better than intervention,” said one author and entrepreneur.

Marc Brackett, founder and director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, argues in his new book “Permission to Feel” that the workplace tends to deny healing.

“You check your feelings at the door because you’re there to do business,” he said. “What people have to realize is emotions don’t get checked at the door. They are at the seat of every table. They’re on the phone with every client and are influencing all aspects of performance.”

For Your Benefit

Eggnog With a Splash of Paid Time Off
Firms are gifting employees with extra holiday cheer through extended end-of-the-year PTO.
By Andie Burjek
P

roviding employees extended time off at the end of the year is one way to add a bit of holiday cheer.

Office closures during the holidays — typically the days between or immediately around Christmas and New Year’s Day — can enhance employee productivity, according to a November 2018 survey of 2,000 full-time employees conducted by Chicago-based consulting firm West Monroe Partners. The study explored employee productivity during the holiday season and gauged how additional days off during the holidays affected that productivity. It found the “employees at offices that close additional days during the holidays are significantly more likely to report higher productivity during the time that they’re actually in the office” — 42 percent compared to 17 percent in offices that don’t shut down outside of federal holidays.

For Your Benefit

Jennifer Benz
PERSONALIZATION VERSUS EASE OF USE

By Jennifer Benz | Benefits Beat

I

recently had coffee with a benefits leader who is implementing a new technology platform for her organization’s employees and spouses. Her scenario is much like that of many of our clients: She works for a big organization with employees all over the United States and in many locations around the world. The company’s benefits and HR programs are complex — and getting more so as it seeks to meet the needs of different employee segments and an increasingly diverse population. Data is used for everything in the organization, and HR is catching up to the rest of the enterprise.

Their goal is to provide a better experience for employees, driven by data. Her team is looking at consolidating all benefits information from existing channels (including the intranet, external sites, vendor sites, email newsletters and more) into a personalized portal.

Legal

6 States Now Mandate Sexual Harassment Prevention Training
Groundwork is laid but ongoing efforts are required for widespread acceptance.
By Matthew C. Berger
T

he #MeToo era has prompted an increasing number of states to mandate sexual harassment prevention training in the workplace. California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maine and New York all have such laws in place.

Here is a look at the laws in these states, noting which employers are covered, deadlines for completion and other nuances.

California mandates training for employers with five or more employees. By January 2020, training must be provided to supervisory and non-supervisory employees within six months of employment or assuming a supervisory position. For seasonal/temporary employees or those hired to work for less than six months, training is mandated within 30 calendar days of hire or within 100 hours worked, whichever occurs first. Excepted are employees of temporary services employers, which must provide training to seasonal/temporary employees.

Legal Briefings

OPTING IN ON PENDING COLLECTIVE ACTION
In Cordúa Restaurants Inc., a restaurant was accused of violating the National Labor Relations Act when it fired employees who opted into a Fair Labor Standards Act collective action. Each employee signed an arbitration agreement requiring them to waive their right to “file, participate or proceed” in a class or collective action, but it did not specifically bar employees from opting in to collective actions. After a number of employees began opting into the FLSA suit, the employer issued a revised arbitration agreement requiring employees to also waive their right to opt in to collective actions. The National Labor Relations Board, which has authority over most nongovernmental employers, expanded on the U.S. Supreme Court’s Epic Systems decision to find that the revised arbitration agreements were enforceable. While the NLRB held the employer violated the NLRA by discharging the employees who engaged in the protected activity of filing an FLSA lawsuit, it concluded the employer did not violate the NLRA by conditioning continued employment on the execution of a revised arbitration agreement even after the initiation of the FLSA suit. Cordúa Restaurants Inc., 368 NLRB No. 43 (2019).
Impact: Under the decision, employers can condition continued employment on the execution of a mandatory arbitration agreement, even when done in response to a pending collective lawsuit.

Legal

The Practical Employer author, Jon Hyman.
A Pox on Ban the Box

Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer

A Pox on Ban the Box
Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer
I

am a podcast fanatic. It’s the best way to spend time on my daily commute and to fill the speakers of my car stereo, I have an unending list of podcasts to which I subscribe. They run the gamut from music related (“Wheels Off With Rhett Miller”), human interest (“Terrible, Thanks for Asking”), travel (“Bittersweet Moment”), and technology (“Reply All”). But my favorite is “Ear Hustle.”

“Ear Hustle” is a podcast about “the daily realities of life inside prison shared by those living it, and stories from the outside, post-incarceration.” One of its recent episodes discussed the realities and difficulties the incarcerated face trying to find employment upon their release from prison.

Getting Schooled on Diversity
The lack of diversity in leadership positions does not coincide with the pool of MBA graduates. What can organizations do to address this concerning representation gap?
By Andie Burjek
A

s the 21st century dawned, enrollment in university MBA programs was a virtual rainbow of diversity. In the early 2000s, MBA graduates were comprised of 36.2 percent people of color and 40.7 percent of grads were women, while 39.1 percent were white males.

At about the same time, chief executive roles were predominately occupied by males, most of whom were white. More than 89 percent of white men and women occupied the chief executive’s chair as of 2005, with 76 percent of those executives being male.

Considering that getting an MBA is generally a key element to a career path leading to the C-suite, the following years should have seen a succession of female and minority executives ascending to leadership roles.

That doesn’t appear to be the case, according to the research department of Human Capital Media, Workforce’s parent company, which compiled data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the National Center for Education Statistics annual digest. The data show that diversity in the C-suite has not kept up with MBA graduation patterns of the past two decades.

graduates wearing caps and gowns
Getting Schooled on Diversity
The lack of diversity in leadership positions does not coincide with the pool of MBA graduates. What can organizations do to address this concerning representation gap?
By Andie Burjek
A

s the 21st century dawned, enrollment in university MBA programs was a virtual rainbow of diversity. In the early 2000s, MBA graduates were comprised of 36.2 percent people of color and 40.7 percent of grads were women, while 39.1 percent were white males.

At about the same time, chief executive roles were predominately occupied by males, most of whom were white. More than 89 percent of white men and women occupied the chief executive’s chair as of 2005, with 76 percent of those executives being male.

Considering that getting an MBA is generally a key element to a career path leading to the C-suite, the following years should have seen a succession of female and minority executives ascending to leadership roles.

That doesn’t appear to be the case, according to the research department of Human Capital Media, Workforce’s parent company, which compiled data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the National Center for Education Statistics annual digest. The data show that diversity in the C-suite has not kept up with MBA graduation patterns of the past two decades.

Sponsored Content
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2020 Workforce Planning
The tools you need to create your 2020 Workforce Strategy
The vice president of technology solutions has demanded 20 new FTEs for next year with specific technology skills. Your recruitment budget doesn’t come close to covering that request. Then there’s the urgent request you received from marketing for two new social media strategists. And logistics needs five new people with updated skill sets. Don’t forget the three people you need in your own HR department.

If this all seems too familiar, you are like many American companies today. Openings are outstrip-ping available candidates and recruitment budgets can’t come close to covering the cost to hire for them – assuming you can find great candidates.

T

he old-school job board model, where employers pay a website to post open positions and hope that qualified candidates will find and apply for them, may not be as flashy or talked about as some of today’s bright, shiny Generation Z gig-worker-marketplace products. But since the dawning of the job board as we know it some 30 years ago they appear to remain a viable business model with plenty of life.

In 2018, online job advertising companies earned a total of $22 billion, according to Staffing Industry Analysts, an increase of 15 percent. And while many companies offer advanced services such as programmatic job advertising or social media tools, the leader in many markets “is a traditional job board that makes 70 to 80 percent of its revenue from job postings,” said Jeff Dickey-Chasins, principal of the industry consulting firm JobBoardDoctor LLC.

T

he old-school job board model, where employers pay a website to post open positions and hope that qualified candidates will find and apply for them, may not be as flashy or talked about as some of today’s bright, shiny Generation Z gig-worker-marketplace products. But since the dawning of the job board as we know it some 30 years ago they appear to remain a viable business model with plenty of life.

In 2018, online job advertising companies earned a total of $22 billion, according to Staffing Industry Analysts, an increase of 15 percent. And while many companies offer advanced services such as programmatic job advertising or social media tools, the leader in many markets “is a traditional job board that makes 70 to 80 percent of its revenue from job postings,” said Jeff Dickey-Chasins, principal of the industry consulting firm JobBoardDoctor LLC.

T

he old-school job board model, where employers pay a website to post open positions and hope that qualified candidates will find and apply for them, may not be as flashy or talked about as some of today’s bright, shiny Generation Z gig-worker-marketplace products. But since the dawning of the job board as we know it some 30 years ago they appear to remain a viable business model with plenty of life.

In 2018, online job advertising companies earned a total of $22 billion, according to Staffing Industry Analysts, an increase of 15 percent. And while many companies offer advanced services such as programmatic job advertising or social media tools, the leader in many markets “is a traditional job board that makes 70 to 80 percent of its revenue from job postings,” said Jeff Dickey-Chasins, principal of the industry consulting firm JobBoardDoctor LLC.

T

he old-school job board model, where employers pay a website to post open positions and hope that qualified candidates will find and apply for them, may not be as flashy or talked about as some of today’s bright, shiny Generation Z gig-worker-marketplace products. But since the dawning of the job board as we know it some 30 years ago they appear to remain a viable business model with plenty of life.

In 2018, online job advertising companies earned a total of $22 billion, according to Staffing Industry Analysts, an increase of 15 percent. And while many companies offer advanced services such as programmatic job advertising or social media tools, the leader in many markets “is a traditional job board that makes 70 to 80 percent of its revenue from job postings,” said Jeff Dickey-Chasins, principal of the industry consulting firm JobBoardDoctor LLC.

Workforce Optimas 2019 Awards logo
Introducing 2019’s
Optimas Award Winners
Capping a Distinguished Decade title
From high-tech VR to a low-tech poster program, HR ends the ‘teens’ with a series of noteworthy initiatives.
L

et’s leave the 2010s with a bang.

Now in its 29th year, the Workforce Optimas Awards celebrate HR’s success at solving some of the biggest business challenges of our time. Each year, the Optimas Awards are given by Workforce to recognize human resources and workforce management initiatives that achieve business results for the organization.

Clemson University’s talent acquisition team blended high-tech and recruiting by using virtual reality alongside its campaign to build a national pool of candidates. The Panda Restaurant Group Inc. sought to strengthen its leadership pipeline through a new training program that caters to the different ways in which employees learn.

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, our Gold winner for Partnership, worked with the Ohio Board of Education in a recruiting and mentoring program with a noble goal: making high school students workplace-ready. Not only does this aid young people looking for real-world experience, but it also aids the state in shaping young professionals who are well prepared when they enter the workforce.

After winning two awards in Managing Change and Vision in 2018 and one award for Recruiting in 2016, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has finally brought home the General Excellence award for its Student Poster Symposium. The fierce competition for STEM talent meant that the national security laboratory is constantly looking for new ways to provide opportunities for and create relationships with high-level tech talent. This past year the organization took its annual student symposium to the next level.

Congratulations to all our 2019 Optimas Award winners!

— Andie Burjek
Workforce Optimas 2019 Awards logo
Introducing 2019’s
Optimas Award Winners
Capping a Distinguished Decade title
From high-tech VR to a low-tech poster program, HR ends the ‘teens’ with a series of noteworthy initiatives.
L

et’s leave the 2010s with a bang.

Now in its 29th year, the Workforce Optimas Awards celebrate HR’s success at solving some of the biggest business challenges of our time. Each year, the Optimas Awards are given by Workforce to recognize human resources and workforce management initiatives that achieve business results for the organization.

Clemson University’s talent acquisition team blended high-tech and recruiting by using virtual reality alongside its campaign to build a national pool of candidates. The Panda Restaurant Group Inc. sought to strengthen its leadership pipeline through a new training program that caters to the different ways in which employees learn.

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, our Gold winner for Partnership, worked with the Ohio Board of Education in a recruiting and mentoring program with a noble goal: making high school students workplace-ready. Not only does this aid young people looking for real-world experience, but it also aids the state in shaping young professionals who are well prepared when they enter the workforce.

After winning two awards in Managing Change and Vision in 2018 and one award for Recruiting in 2016, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has finally brought home the General Excellence award for its Student Poster Symposium. The fierce competition for STEM talent meant that the national security laboratory is constantly looking for new ways to provide opportunities for and create relationships with high-level tech talent. This past year the organization took its annual student symposium to the next level.

Congratulations to all our 2019 Optimas Award winners!

— Andie Burjek
Science Fair With Flair title
Science Fair With Flair title
E

ach year during Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Student Poster Symposium, interns make posters representing the work they’ve accomplished during their tenure at the Bay Area federal research facility.

The sheer number of 2019’s interns, however, took the annual event to an entirely new level.

Compared to 278 students who presented their work last year, 2019 boasted 382 students presenting work in STEM topics such as global security, computing, engineering and other related topics. This year the symposium took place in three sessions over two days in August followed by the awards ceremony.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory logo
From left, Jan Patrick Lehr, Elizbeth Grace, Christopher Lam, Michael Wadas, Susan Lowder, Sam Iaquinta, Trevor Pollack and Courtney Quinn. Lowder oversees the student hiring program and the interns participated in Lawrence Livermore’s Student Poster Symposium.
Science Fair With Flair title
Science Fair With Flair title
E

ach year during Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Student Poster Symposium, interns make posters representing the work they’ve accomplished during their tenure at the Bay Area federal research facility.

The sheer number of 2019’s interns, however, took the annual event to an entirely new level.

Compared to 278 students who presented their work last year, 2019 boasted 382 students presenting work in STEM topics such as global security, computing, engineering and other related topics. This year the symposium took place in three sessions over two days in August followed by the awards ceremony.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory logo
From left, Jan Patrick Lehr, Elizbeth Grace, Christopher Lam, Michael Wadas, Susan Lowder, Sam Iaquinta, Trevor Pollack and Courtney Quinn. Lowder oversees the student hiring program and the interns participated in Lawrence Livermore’s Student Poster Symposium.
Financial Wellness Providers
Financial Wellness Plan Fatigue

An always-complicated field has grown more complex in recent years, necessitating greater use of consultancies to help employers find the right plans and options for their workforce.

By Patty Kujawa
B

JC HealthCare launched a brand new financial wellness program for its 32,000 employees in early 2018, only to have the provider pull the product at the end of the year because of low take-up rates.

Conceptually, BJC thought the program was going to make a big difference for employees with financial issues, said John Higdon, manager of BJC’s retirement plans. Employees could log into their devices and choose from a host of vendors on one platform and get help with their particular money issue.

“We thought it was a worthwhile product,” Higdon said. “But we experienced what a lot of other clients experienced: For whatever reason, people didn’t do anything beyond registering.”

Relocation Providers

Relocation Moving to Benefit Status
Internal mobility is the hot new employee engagement tool, giving relocation vendors a chance to reinvent themselves.
By Sarah Fister Gale
I

f you can’t fill critical roles through new hires, why not recruit for them internally? It is a question that many companies are pondering as they consider their global talent gaps, and it is driving changes in the way they think about relocation.

Internal mobility is becoming a priority for companies as a tool to attract and keep top talent, said Vince Cordova, principal at Mercer focusing on global mobility. “They are thinking about it more as a way to create an employee value proposition than as a tactical tool to address a resource gap.”

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recently received a story pitch with the subject line, “Do Baby Boomers Need to Go Under the Knife to Keep Their Edge at Work?”

Sure, roll your eyes. Scoff at a pitch with a pandering subject line that cries “Open me!” like a pricey bottle of booze at a five-dollar white elephant holiday gift exchange. Crinkle your nose and sniff a haughty sniff at the thought of someone actually undergoing plastic surgery to keep an edge at work.

November/December 2019 | Volume 98, Issue 6

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WORKFORCE EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Arie Ball, Vice President, Sourcing and Talent Acquisition, Sodexo
Angela Bailey, Associate Director and Chief Human Capital Officer, U.S. Office of Personnel Management
Kris Dunn, Chief Human Resources Officer, Kinetix, and Founder, Fistful of Talent and HR Capitalist
Curtis Gray, Senior Vice President, Human Resources and Administration, BAE Systems
Jil Greene, Vice President, Human Resources and Community Relations, Harrah’s New Orleans
Ted Hoff, Human Resources Vice President, Global Sales and Sales Incentives, IBM
Tracy Kofski, Vice President, Compensation and Benefits, General Mills
Jon Hyman, Partner, Meyers, Roman, Friedberg & Lewis
Jim McDermid, Vice President, Human Resources, Cardiac and Vascular Group, Medtronic
Randall Moon, Vice President, International HR, Benefits and HRIS, Lowe’s Cos.
Dan Satterthwaite, Head of Human Resources, DreamWorks
Dave Ulrich, Professor, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan

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