May/June 2019

May/June 2019

| From Our Editors

Mike Prokopeak, Editor in Chief
No company is perfect.

Key people leave. One employee’s disastrous choice threatens an entire company. Business goes south.

It’s not what happens that defines a company. It’s what it does in response.

When times are good, companies turn a profit. They retain their people. They see results. Good business conditions mask bad employee practices.

When things turn for the worse you see what’s been hiding all along. Good HR is a hedge against bad results. While solid HR practices never insulate a company from risk, they certainly decrease it.

Take a look at the Workforce 100 list of best companies for HR in this issue. You’ll see a few that have a dent or two. What sets them apart isn’t perfection. It’s their execution.

—Mike Prokopeak,
Editor in Chief

The workplace has changed a lot since 1922. That year The Journal of Personnel Research debuted, rebranded later as Personnel Journal and finally Workforce. Now in our 97th year, we take a look back at what was on the minds of past generations of people managers.

Hold My Beer — And Don’t Give It Back, June 1965

Preventative care is a popular health care topic in 2019. But Personnel Journal urged the same strategy to deal with “problem drinkers” in the 1960s.

Before they become full-blown alcoholics, people are problem drinkers, according to the article. Titled “Industry’s $2-Billion Headache,” it argues that companies have a responsibility to “find ways to save, not merely the billions of dollars lost, but the terrific human waste.”

Taking a progressive and nuanced approach, author Richard E. Dutton of the University of South Florida highlights the fact that problem drinking is an illness, not a moral failing, and that it’s treatable. It’s still difficult to treat, as the person with the problem will try to hide it from themselves and others for as long as they can. That way, “he can avoid coming to grips with his problem.”

“In many countries, the use of alcoholic beverages is thought of almost as a folkway, such as bowling or square-dancing,” the article stated. It also explored another historical idea about drinking, pointing out the flaws in the problematic belief that “the alcoholic had to reach rock bottom before he could be helped.”

Overall, the article explored the facts behind problem drinking and sought to debunk certain myths about alcoholism, as well as explaining to supervisors why they should help problem drinkers before they become alcoholics.

The issue also featured an article titled, “The Computer — A Challenge to the Personnel Professional” and a review of the 1964 book “Emotional Health on the World of Work,” which touted the importance of “emotional first aid.”

Andie Burjek

All About the Employees, September 2004
Workforce Management September 2004 The fall of 2004 was a time when organizations saw fit to invest and enhance their employee populations. The malaise of the dot-com bust was past and the pending financial meltdown was an election cycle away.

What to do with all this extra money lying around? Cigna Inc. committed $2 million annually to recruiting and developing executive women as a business strategy, not political correctness, according to the story “When Women Rise.” Fifteen years after publication, IT Project Manager Diana McGinnis is the lone woman profiled in the story who remains with Cigna.

Disney Corp. took a bit of a different approach to the Magic Kingdom’s people programs, according to the story “Magic for Sale.” It was the dawning of the Disney Institute, where other companies could glean — for a price of course — Disney’s famed people-management techniques.

The eclectic employee base at specialty grocer Trader Joe’s also was in the spotlight: “The upbeat employees who wander the aisles, eager to chat about the latest Brie or newest flavor of hummus,” the story noted.

Mmmmm, Brie. . . .

Rick Bell

Workforce Management September 2004 The fall of 2004 was a time when organizations saw fit to invest and enhance their employee populations. The malaise of the dot-com bust was past and the pending financial meltdown was an election cycle away.

What to do with all this extra money lying around? Cigna Inc. committed $2 million annually to recruiting and developing executive women as a business strategy, not political correctness, according to the story “When Women Rise.” Fifteen years after publication, IT Project Manager Diana McGinnis is the lone woman profiled in the story who remains with Cigna.

Disney Corp. took a bit of a different approach to the Magic Kingdom’s people programs, according to the story “Magic for Sale.” It was the dawning of the Disney Institute, where other companies could glean — for a price of course — Disney’s famed people-management techniques.

The eclectic employee base at specialty grocer Trader Joe’s also was in the spotlight: “The upbeat employees who wander the aisles, eager to chat about the latest Brie or newest flavor of hummus,” the story noted.

Mmmmm, Brie. . . .

Rick Bell

Sponsored

Get the Competitive Advantage
4 ways to hire and retain the best employees
Ameritas Insight
Competitive Advantage
Introduction
T

hese days, many job seekers are looking at more than their base salary when evaluating companies. Often, they want to know about work-life balance, corporate social responsibility or job perks. As the workforce changes and organizations increase their hiring to replace outgoing workers, they’ll need to take a hard look at their competitive advantages in the marketplace.

Organizational goals often include improving employee retention, raising employee engagement, increasing participation in benefits and wellness programs or finding better recruits. More and more, businesses use employee benefits strategies to achieve these goals. This creates a competitive advantage, as potential employees are more likely to work for organizations that show they care about members of their workforce.

WORKFORCE 100

On The Cover

WORKFORCE 100:
THE BEST HR PRACTICES


Southwest’s people practices puts it atop year six of our list recognizing the best in HR.

Cover Photo by Stewart Cohen

Sector Report

44

Rewards & Recognition Providers

There seems to be something for every employee among the voluntary benefits offerings.

46

EAP Providers

Companies want proof that employee assistance programs add value — and vendors are starting to respond.

FEATURES

24

THE WORKFORCE 100

Find out which companies made the list in the sixth annual Workforce 100.

28

Flying TO THE TOP

The ups and downs of people management are becoming apparent on the Workforce 100.

32

CULTURE IS KING

The annual Workforce 100 list reveals the importance of best practices in people management in developing culture.

40

TOXIC ISLANDS

Bridging the sometimes difficult relationships between supervisor and report is well worth the effort.

Navigating the Toxic Triangle
Culture is King
Culture is King

On The Web

speak up!

The Workforce online community provides you with virtual meeting places to chat about issues and trends affecting you and your workplace.
 

Join the group:
workforce.com/linkedingroup

Columns

4

your force

When HR helps companies succeed.

14

WORK IN PROGRESS

Meet Gandhi, The Mentor and The Judge.

19

Benefits beat

Benefits changes are hard — even for a team of benefits experts.

22

THE PRACTICAL EMPLOYER

Securing your passwords goes a long way toward cybersecurity.

50

THE LAST WORD

History offers a lesson for #fixitSHRM.

For Your Benefit

16

SECURING BENEFITS

A lack of cybersecurity surrounding employee retirement plans troubles benefits leaders.

17

CRUMBLING COVERAGE

There are fewer uninsured Americans since the ACA’s passage but more are underinsured.

17

ROAD WARRIOR WOES

Business travel may be exciting, but those on the road should be mindful of their health away from home.

18

CAREGIVING CONCERNS

More employers are offering paid leave for caregivers to attract millennial-aged employees.

Trending

10

TERMINATING EMPLOYEES

Workplace shootings prompt reconsideration of procedures.

11

PEOPLE MOVES AND BY THE NUMBERS

Oates-Forney new Waste Management CHRO; diversity.

12

Q&A

Todd Carlisle, VP of people at beauty company Ipsy.

12

GOODBYE, GLOBOFORCE

Globoforce celebrates 20 years by renaming itself Workhuman.

Legal

20

SOCIAL STUDIES

Considering the legalities of socially conscious policies.

21

LEGAL BRIEFINGS

FMLA; workplace stalkers.

Trending

Reevaluating Termination Policies Following Workplace Shooting

Companies are urged to reconsider their procedures when making changes to staff.

By Carol Brzozowski

H

uman resources professionals are assessing termination procedures following the Feb. 15 workplace shootings at the Henry Pratt Co. manufacturing plant in Aurora, Illinois.

Michelle Lee, HR director for the Wynright Corp. in Elk Grove, Illinois, noted, “While we review and evaluate our policies on a regular basis, this situation emphasizes the importance of protecting our employees. We are going to partner more with local law enforcement to ensure they understand the make-up of our facilities and employee population. In some cases, we may have them on premises for risky terminations.”

The shooting by a 15-year employee being terminated that day killed five employees, including the HR director and an HR intern on his first day on the job, and wounded five police officers.

According to federal government statistics, there were 458 workplace homicides in 2017, of which 351 were committed with a gun.

PEOPLE
Silvana BattagliaSilvana Battaglia
Health care company AmerisourceBergen named Silvana Battaglia as executive vice president and chief human resources officer. Battaglia will be responsible for leading the global human resources department. Battaglia has more than two decades of experience running international HR organizations for Fortune 500 companies, helping shape workforce planning and more.
Angela Bretz Angela Bretz
Insurance and financial services company Nationwide named Angela Bretz as chief diversity officer. A career Nationwide employee, Bretz will oversee the inclusion and diversity office, which serves as a critical function of Nationwide’s business, partnering with senior leadership to foster an environment that aligns with the strategic impact and importance of the diversity and inclusion work at the company.
Tamla Oates-Forney Tamla Oates-Forney
Waste Management named Tamla Oates-Forney as senior vice president and chief human resources officer. Oates-Forney is responsible for all aspects of the company’s HR functions including leadership development and succession planning, HR operations, employee relations, labor relations, HR information systems, compensation, benefits, L&D and talent acquisition.
moves
Shawna McNamee Shawna McNamee
Mercedes-Benz Financial Services USA named Shawna McNamee as director of human resources and administrative services for the Americas region. McNamee joined the company in 2015 as director of HR and administrative services for Mercedes-Benz Financial Services Canada. Complementary to this role, McNamee is now a member of Daimler Financial Services Americas’ Operations Committee and the HR Global Leadership Team.
Pamela Puryear Pamela Puryear
Medical devices company Zimmer Biomet named Pamela Puryear as senior vice president, chief human resources officer. Puryear, who most recently served as senior VP and chief talent officer at Pfizer, will report directly to Zimmer Biomet President and CEO Bryan Hanson.
Greg Till Greg Till
Providence St. Joseph Health named Greg Till chief people officer. Till will assume leadership of the HR department, reporting directly to Chief Administrative Officer Debra A. Canales. Since Till joined Providence in 2014, he has partnered with regional, clinical, and administrative leadership to improve the employee experience and refine hiring processes.
To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com.
Include People Moves in the subject line.
PEOPLE moves
PEOPLE moves
Silvana Battaglia
Silvana Battaglia
Health care company AmerisourceBergen named Silvana Battaglia as executive vice president and chief human resources officer. Battaglia will be responsible for leading the global human resources department. Battaglia has more than two decades of experience running international HR organizations for Fortune 500 companies, helping shape workforce planning and more.
Angela Bretz
Angela Bretz
Insurance and financial services company Nationwide named Angela Bretz as chief diversity officer. A career Nationwide employee, Bretz will oversee the inclusion and diversity office, which serves as a critical function of Nationwide’s business, partnering with senior leadership to foster an environment that aligns with the strategic impact and importance of the diversity and inclusion work at the company.
Tamla Oates-Forney
Tamla Oates-Forney
Waste Management named Tamla Oates-Forney as senior vice president and chief human resources officer. Oates-Forney is responsible for all aspects of the company’s HR functions including leadership development and succession planning, HR operations, employee relations, labor relations, HR information systems, compensation, benefits, L&D and talent acquisition.
Shawna McNamee
Shawna McNamee
Mercedes-Benz Financial Services USA named Shawna McNamee as director of human resources and administrative services for the Americas region. McNamee joined the company in 2015 as director of HR and administrative services for Mercedes-Benz Financial Services Canada. Complementary to this role, McNamee is now a member of Daimler Financial Services Americas’ Operations Committee and the HR Global Leadership Team.
Pamela Puryear
Pamela Puryear
Medical devices company Zimmer Biomet named Pamela Puryear as senior vice president, chief human resources officer. Puryear, who most recently served as senior VP and chief talent officer at Pfizer, will report directly to Zimmer Biomet President and CEO Bryan Hanson.
Greg Till
Greg Till
Providence St. Joseph Health named Greg Till chief people officer. Till will assume leadership of the HR department, reporting directly to Chief Administrative Officer Debra A. Canales. Since Till joined Providence in 2014, he has partnered with regional, clinical, and administrative leadership to improve the employee experience and refine hiring processes.
To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com.
Include People Moves in the subject line.
Workforce May/June 2019 - By the Numbers

Trending

Todd Carlisle, Ipsy
AI’s Growing Role in HR
By Bethany Tomasian

Todd Carlisle is vice president of people at Ipsy, a beauty company based in San Mateo, California. A former HR director at Twitter and Google, Carlisle says “Ipsy” is a play on the Latin word “Ipse,” which means “self.” Workforce Editorial Associate Bethany Tomasian recently caught up with Carlisle.

Workforce: How does HR within a startup differ from more established companies?

Todd Carlisle: There are a lot of differences. The first is that you are forced to become a generalist really fast. At more established companies, you have an immigrations team, benefits team, an analytics team or a diversity team. At a smaller company there might be five of you and all five of you have to learn how to do all of those things. I quickly learned that some of the stuff that I’ve done well in the past were fine but there are all these other parts of HR that needed attention. At a startup, there’s no one to turn around and pass the ball to. You have to do it. Another difference is that whatever you’re offering to employees, even at a small start-up, you’re still going to be compared to the big companies. Since Ipsy is located in Silicon Valley, we’re compared to big tech companies.

Trending

Workhuman Is Born
By Bethany Tomasian
A

s a longtime employee rewards and recognition solutions company celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, it marks another milestone as co-founder and CEO Eric Mosley announced that Globoforce rebranded itself as Workhuman.

Headquartered in Framingham, Massachusetts, and Dublin, Ireland, Workhuman also is the name of Globoforce’s annual conference.

“This evolution acknowledges both the traction and effectiveness of our Workhuman Cloud platform, and the demand from progressive global organizations who want to motivate and empower their people to do the best work of their lives,” Mosley said in a February press statement.

Some 4 million people in more than 160 countries access Workhuman Cloud, according to the release.

Trending

The Importance of Happiness at Work

By Marc Coleman

Marc Coleman
L

ast year, members of our HR community called me with common feedback that they were meeting so many people who are unhappy at work and life. Any research you choose to look at for the past 10 years averages nearly three-quarters of people are looking for jobs and many of them are unhappy with their work.

Mo Gawdat, the founder of onebillionhappy.org and former chief business officer at Google X, focuses on the relation between innovation and happiness. After losing his son Ali, he made it his personal mission to help 1 billion people become happier in all aspects of their life. I saw him speak last year and after he tells the room it is all right to be happy at work, Mo’s speech brought tears to thousands of attendees.

Trending

A Sprint Into Employee Communications

By Rick Bell

S

ome say you have to crawl before you can walk.

To that we say, let’s just sprint.

Workforce is in the planning stages of our inaugural content sprint that will encompass roughly eight weeks over the course of the months of May and June. We are labeling this content sprint as Workforce Focus. The theme of our first-ever content sprint, errr, Workforce Focus, is a topic that seems so simple yet confounds and confuses even the best, most highly progressive workplace cultures.

The topic? Employee communications. Indeed, it’s a vast area of managing a workforce, and it’s arguably the most vital and crucial point of getting things done.

Think about it: We all use email to communicate with a colleague across the aisle or halfway around the globe. And there are any number of communications tools at our disposal, from Slack to Skype to Flowdock. We update our budgets in Google Sheets and log our documents in Dropbox.

Trending

Workforce's Work in Progress author Kris Dunn.
Meet Gandhi, The Mentor and The Judge

By Kris Dunn | Work in Progress

Y

ou can’t talk about companies with great HR without talking about the HR leader in charge.

Some companies are blessed with incredible market position, strong economic advantages and visionary founders. Within these rare organizations, it’s hard for culture and progressive people practices not to thrive.

Then there’s everybody else. If your company exists in normal circumstances, how strong your HR team is and the way it is viewed typically falls on your HR leader, their match for your company and ability to build effective people practices.

I’ve spent the past few years studying the ability of HR pros at all levels to innovate, drive change and add true value, and my book on the topic — “The 9 Faces of HR” — publishes this June. Based on my research, I believe there are three types of HR leaders in the world today, segmented by traits that drive their distinct and unique worldviews.

For Your Benefit

Cybersecurity Retirement Risks Trouble Benefits Leaders
Preparedness varies between sectors due to ability to embrace industry evaluation standards.
By Patty Kujawa
T

he $5 trillion in retirement plans have become a “tempting target” for hackers to access sensitive information held by plan providers in the industry, so two legislators asked the Government Accountability Office to examine data protections, processes and procedures within the private retirement system.

U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Washington, and U.S. Rep. Robert C. “Bobby” Scott, D-Virginia., sent the letter in February, saying that cybersecurity protections are ill-defined, especially when it comes to what needs to be done in the event of a data breach. The legislators asked the GAO to examine 10 pointed questions around the safety of the private retirement system.

“It is important that workers and retirees know their savings are in fact safe, and that a cyberattack will not throw the retirement they have spent years working and planning for into jeopardy,” the letter said.

For Your Benefit

ACA Wins and Losses
Uninsured down, underinsured up.
By Rita Pyrillis
S

ince the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, fewer people are uninsured but the number of underinsured has spiked, especially among people covered by employer-sponsored health plans, according to a recent study.

An estimated 44 million people who were insured throughout 2018 did not have adequate coverage because of high out-of-pocket costs and deductibles, up from 29 million in 2010, according to a report by The Commonwealth Fund. The biggest increase in underinsured adults is occurring among those in employer health plans.

“What we are seeing is a steady upward trend of higher out-of-pocket costs and deductibles,” said Sara Collins, a co-author of the report. “We are seeing an increase in the size of deductibles relative to income. It’s a trend in employer benefits as employers look for ways to share health care costs. People in the individual market are most likely to be uninsured, but the trend in employer-based plans is distinctive.”

For Your Benefit

Road Warrior Woes
Business travel is exciting but not always healthy.
By Andie Burjek

L

ong-distance trips may be something to boast about, with wanderlust-driven influencers posting perfectly filtered photos on their social media accounts. Work-sponsored road trips also may sound glamorous but workers should recognize the potential negative impacts of business travel on their health.

Frequent business travel is associated with poorer health outcomes, according to “Business Travel and Behavioral and Mental Health,” a 2018 article from the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The analysis found that people who traveled more often for work were more likely to smoke, have trouble sleeping and show higher levels of anxiety and depression symptoms. The study concluded that “employers should provide programs to help employees manage stress and maintain health while traveling for work.”

Hal F. Rosenbluth, chairman and CEO of New Ocean Health Solutions, at one point hit the road every other week for work. Rosenbluth knows the challenges of regular business travel within the U.S. and abroad. For people who travel overseas, there’s “always the possibility of sickness or geopolitical events that require immediate attention and sometimes evacuation,” he said.

Man laying on bed tired from a road trip
L

ong-distance trips may be something to boast about, with wanderlust-driven influencers posting perfectly filtered photos on their social media accounts. Work-sponsored road trips also may sound glamorous but workers should recognize the potential negative impacts of business travel on their health.

Frequent business travel is associated with poorer health outcomes, according to “Business Travel and Behavioral and Mental Health,” a 2018 article from the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The analysis found that people who traveled more often for work were more likely to smoke, have trouble sleeping and show higher levels of anxiety and depression symptoms. The study concluded that “employers should provide programs to help employees manage stress and maintain health while traveling for work.”

Hal F. Rosenbluth, chairman and CEO of New Ocean Health Solutions, at one point hit the road every other week for work. Rosenbluth knows the challenges of regular business travel within the U.S. and abroad. For people who travel overseas, there’s “always the possibility of sickness or geopolitical events that require immediate attention and sometimes evacuation,” he said.

For Your Benefit

Paid Leave for Caregivers Being Used to Attract Millennials
More than just benefits, empathy and understanding are important to younger workers.
By Rita Pyrillis
A

s the demand for family friendly benefits grows, employers are responding by offering paid leave to new parents.

While that’s good news for families, a rapidly growing segment of the workforce is often overlooked — employees who are caring for an aging parent, an ailing spouse or other loved one.

About 40 million people in the U.S. are caring for an adult family member and 60 percent of them are employed, according to a 2015 report by AARP. And an increasing number are stepping into that role at a younger age. About a quarter of all caregivers are millennials ages 18-34, according to AARP’s research.

That is why a small but growing number of employers are expanding their family leave policies and offering paid leave to employees caring for a loved one, whether it’s a child, a parent, a spouse, or an in-law or grandparent.

For Your Benefit

Jennifer Benz
Personal Lessons in Communicating Change

By Jennifer Benz | Benefits Beat

A

t the start of the year, I took a personal crash course in navigating organizational change. Despite consulting on issues around change management for most of my career, I learned it’s a different animal when you’re right in the middle of it yourself. Going through a big change reinforced a lot of what I know — and it gave me some new insights.

The source of all this change? My company, Benz Communications, joined forces with The Segal Group on Jan. 1. By absolutely all measures, this was — and is — an awesome step for our team, our business and our clients.

Segal is an 80-year-old privately held employee benefits and HR consulting firm that works with an amazing group of clients around the country. Our communications team doubled from 30 to 60 people, and we are so proud to be part of an organization with Segal’s history, values, people and clients. One of my favorite comments from a member of my team was “I feel like I just got an even better job — along with 30 of my best friends.”

Still, all the good stuff doesn’t mean change isn’t hard.

Legal

The Precarious Legalities of Socially Conscious Workplace Policies
By Tim K. Garrett
M

ore and more employers are adopting socially conscious practices that impact the manner in which the employer operates.

My firm’s headquarters are in a Certified LEED “green building.” Generally, companies in such buildings commit to reducing the use of plasticware.

In July 2018, American Airlines and Starbucks announced they will no longer use plastic straws. But, how far can and should these practices go? Could a company in a Certified LEED green building refuse a reimbursement request from an employee who had a business meal at a restaurant that uses only plasticware? Could American Airlines or Starbucks discipline an employee who was caught using a plastic straw at work? Likely, yes.

Legal Briefings

FMLA LEAVE: DESIGNATE EARLY AND OFTEN
In Hannah P. v. Coats, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence allowed an analyst to take four weeks of paid sick and personal leave for her depression without notifying her that she was entitled to up to 12 weeks of FMLA leave. The employee returned to work after four weeks and was found not qualified for a permanent position. The court found if the employee could convince a jury she would have structured her leave differently had she received an FMLA notice, then she could prevail at trial on her FMLA claim. The onus is on employers to notify employees when a leave of absence qualifies under FMLA. If an employer fails to notify the employee of FMLA designation, the employee can obtain relief under FMLA if they were prejudiced by the failure to designate. The Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor recently issued an opinion letter stating its view that employers may not delay designating paid leave as FMLA leave merely because they provide family and medical leave that is more generous than the FMLA. Hannah P. v. Coats, 916 F.3d 327 (4th Cir. 2019); FMLA2019-1-A.

IMPACT: To minimize liability, employers should notify their employees of their FMLA rights whenever an employee takes paid leave for an FMLA-qualifying purpose.

Legal

The Practical Employer author, Jon Hyman.
The DMV and Cybersecurity

Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer

The DMV and Cybersecurity

By Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer

I

spent way too much of a recent Saturday morning at the local department of motor vehicles. My plates were expiring and I had forgotten to take advantage of online registration.So there I found myself at 10 a.m. waiting in line. To be fair, it was the “express” line, designated for registration renewals only. My experience, however, was less than express, thanks to the patron two spots ahead of me.

On her turn, the clerk asked for information stored in some account on her phone. She did not, however, remember the necessary password. She then removed an inch-thick flipbook of Post-it notes, each containing a login and password to a different account.

I watched her rifle through the stack. Ten minutes of life that I will never regain, with my frustration mirrored on the faces of everyone else in line.

Workforce 100 2019
Southwest Airlines’ ascent to the No. 1 spot a long time coming.
Compiled by Workforce editors
C

hange is often a gradual process. As much as most organizations would like to see big results from a new program, initiative or benefit sooner rather than later, it could take time to see the fruits of their labor. Long-term improvements in culture or employee morale may seem daunting, but the patient employer often is rewarded.

Now in its sixth year, the Workforce 100 recognizes companies that excelled in human resources over the course of the previous year. To determine which companies make the list, Workforce editors work with researchers from the Human Capital Media Research and Advisory Group, the publication’s research division.

Southwest Airlines
Julie Weber, vice president and chief people officer
Industry: Airline
Dallas
Employees: 58,000
Performance Index: 9.2

T-Mobile
Liz McAuliffe, executive vice president of human resources
Industry: Telecommunications
Bellevue, Washington
Employees: 52,218
Performance Index: 8.911

Goldman Sachs
Dane Holmes, head of human capital management
Industry: Financial services
New York
Employees: 36,000
Performance Index: 8.756

Workforce 100
Flying to
the Top
Southwest ascends the Workforce 100
By Bethany Tomasian
Workforce 100
Flying to
the Top
Southwest ascends the Workforce 100
Flying to
the Top
Southwest ascends the Workforce 100
By Bethany Tomasian
By Bethany Tomasian
Photos by Stewart Cohen
P

er aspera ad astra is a Latin phrase that translates, “through hardships to the stars.” The phrase serves as a reminder that progress is not always a straight-ahead path. Often there are forks in the road and winding turns that can hinder the journey. How one navigates those obstacles is the essence of one’s character. The same applies for companies as they strive for HR excellence. For many companies, the journey comes with a fair share of challenges, successes and lessons learned.

Workforce has recognized 100 companies for the past six years that have excelled in people management with the annual Workforce 100 list of best HR practices. Workforce editors and researchers initially partnered with employee review site Glassdoor in 2016 to get an internal perspective of employee satisfaction with their company. Before the partnership with Glassdoor the Workforce 100 list leaned in favor of large corporations and did not take into account the thoughts and responses of rank-and-file employees. Since the partnership began, the list has evolved to include smaller organizations and reveals the value of a strong employer-employee relationship. A company’s score is calculated using Human Capital Media’s Research and Advisory Group and Glassdoor rankings. The inclusion of Glassdoor to the methodology seemingly plays a role in the rise and fall of company rankings.

Inside the Workforce 100
Culture is King
Workforce 100
This year’s Workforce 100 list reveals the importance best practices in people management play in developing a continuously strong workplace culture.
By Andie Burjek; Research by Grey Litaker
A

s the organizations comprising the 2019 Workforce 100 reveal, outstanding human resources practices are worth celebrating. And great HR is not elusive for those that understand the importance of best practices.

The research team at Human Capital Media, the parent company of Workforce, recently released its annual “HR State of the Industry” report, which provides HR leaders a glimpse into what most companies rely on in their people management practices for five major disciplines of HR: culture, compensation, benefits, health care benefits, and HR management technologies (methodology on p. 36). It’s also the entity charged with creating the Workforce 100 list, which ranks an organization’s human resources practices in seven core areas of people management: Culture, Employee Development, Leadership, Diversity, Recruiting, Benefits and Innovation.

In collaboration with the research team, Workforce’s editorial team has explored the data from these two reports — the Workforce 100 and the 2019 “HR State of the Industry” — to explore best practices in HR. Workforce analyzed the top-performing companies of the Workforce 100 in each core area of HR measured, spoke to several companies that made the Workforce 100 and compared their practices to those found in the 2019 “HR State of the Industry” report.

Inside the Workforce 100
Culture is King
Workforce 100
This year’s Workforce 100 list reveals the importance best practices in people management play in developing a continuously strong workplace culture.
By Andie Burjek; Research by Grey Litaker
A

s the organizations comprising the 2019 Workforce 100 reveal, outstanding human resources practices are worth celebrating. And great HR is not elusive for those that understand the importance of best practices.

The research team at Human Capital Media, the parent company of Workforce, recently released its annual “HR State of the Industry” report, which provides HR leaders a glimpse into what most companies rely on in their people management practices for five major disciplines of HR: culture, compensation, benefits, health care benefits, and HR management technologies (methodology on p. 36). It’s also the entity charged with creating the Workforce 100 list, which ranks an organization’s human resources practices in seven core areas of people management: Culture, Employee Development, Leadership, Diversity, Recruiting, Benefits and Innovation.

In collaboration with the research team, Workforce’s editorial team has explored the data from these two reports — the Workforce 100 and the 2019 “HR State of the Industry” — to explore best practices in HR. Workforce analyzed the top-performing companies of the Workforce 100 in each core area of HR measured, spoke to several companies that made the Workforce 100 and compared their practices to those found in the 2019 “HR State of the Industry” report.

Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content
What You Need to Know to Hire and Keep the Best Employees in 2019
New research uncovers best practices for creating a competitive advantage by approaching employee benefits strategically.
These days, employers and employees should be aligned in their business and personal goals. For organizations, their business goals often include improving retention, raising engagement, increasing benefits participation or recruiting more high-potential candidates. Offering competitive salaries is one way to achieve these goals, but today’s job seekers are looking beyond their base salary when evaluating companies. As the workforce changes, organizations will need to take a hard look at their competitive advantages in the marketplace.

More and more, businesses use employee benefits strategies to achieve these goals. This creates a competitive advantage, as potential employees are more likely to work for organizations that show they care about members of their workforce. Ameritas recently partnered with the research arm of Workforce for the Using Benefits for Competitive Advantage survey, asking more than 400 employers exactly how they use benefits programs strategically. The data shows competitive advantage can be gained by addressing four key areas regarding employee benefits:

Toxic Triangle Title
Bridging the relationship between supervisor and report is a difficult but worthwhile journey.
By Mary-Clare Race
R

elationships are complex, particularly so at work since employees have limited control over who they interact with.

While there’s no shortage of advice on how to deal with matters of the heart, working relationships are rarely discussed until it becomes painfully obvious they’re not working. In the wake of the #MeToo movement there has been an increasing focus on fostering more respectful workplace environments.

Yet most managers receive little guidance when it comes to building, maintaining and repairing healthy relationships that often foster toxic workplaces. In many instances they evolve into one of three types of supervisor: the buddy, the boss or the bully.

In a study of what makes a manager effective, the quality of their relationships was found to make the biggest difference to their success. Understand how to do relationships well and everything else becomes easier. Feedback is better received, delegation of duties becomes more straightforward and employees find it easier to cope with change.

Toxic Triangle Title
Bridging the relationship between supervisor and report is a difficult but worthwhile journey.
By Mary-Clare Race
R

elationships are complex, particularly so at work since employees have limited control over who they interact with.

While there’s no shortage of advice on how to deal with matters of the heart, working relationships are rarely discussed until it becomes painfully obvious they’re not working. In the wake of the #MeToo movement there has been an increasing focus on fostering more respectful workplace environments.

Yet most managers receive little guidance when it comes to building, maintaining and repairing healthy relationships that often foster toxic workplaces. In many instances they evolve into one of three types of supervisor: the buddy, the boss or the bully.

In a study of what makes a manager effective, the quality of their relationships was found to make the biggest difference to their success. Understand how to do relationships well and everything else becomes easier. Feedback is better received, delegation of duties becomes more straightforward and employees find it easier to cope with change.

Voluntary Benefits

Offering Something for Everyone
Health care and financial assistance tools are proving popular with employees.
By Sarah Fister Gale
V

oluntary benefits have officially crossed the threshold from add-on feature to arguably the most vital part of every benefits program.

“Voluntary benefits are now the center of the benefits strategy,” said Amy Hollis of Hollis Consulting, a benefits consulting firm in Atlanta. “They have become integral to the rewards offering as a tool to support recruiting and retention.”

The question now isn’t whether to offer these optional benefits, but which ones to put on the menu.

Financial wellness and tools to mitigate health care costs continue to top the list of popular voluntary benefits options. More than 40 percent of companies offered accident, critical illness and/or hospital indemnity benefits in 2018, and 25 percent of employees took advantage of one or more of these offerings.

Employee Assistance Program Providers

The Business Benefit of EAPs
Companies want proof that EAPs add value — and vendors are starting to respond.

By Sarah Fister Gale

E

mployee assistance programs were originally created to address alcoholism and drug use in the workplace.

These programs have since matured to address a broad range of issues that can affect all aspects of employee performance and engagement. From the misuse of drugs and alcohol to stress, anxiety, sleep disorders and depression, they take on “virtually every problem an employee could have,” said Gregory DeLapp, CEO of the Employee Assistance Professionals Association.

This evolution has also changed who runs the programs, he added. In the beginning, most EAP leaders came to the role through the training department or because of their own recovery. But today, most EAP professionals have a social work background or mental health training.

Advertisers’ index

Advertisers/URLs

Page


38-39
3rd Cover

Advertisers/URLs

Page


Back Cover
2nd Cover-4
Advertising Sales
Clifford Capone
Vice President,
Group Publisher

312-967-3538
ccapone@Workforce.com


Derek Graham
Regional Sales Manager
312-967-3591
dgraham@Workforce.com
AL, AR, DE, FL, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MI, MN, MO, MS, NC, ND, NE, OH, OK, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA, WI, WV, District of Columbia, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan Newfoundland, Europe


Daniella Weinberg
Regional Sales Manager
917-627-1125
dweinberg@Workforce.com
CT, MA, MD, ME, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT, Quebec, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Europe


Kevin M. Fields
Director, Business Development
312-967-3565
kfields@Workforce.com

Melanie Lee
Business Administration Manager
mlee@Workforce.com

Advertising:
For advertising information, write to sales@workforce.com.


Back Issues:
For all requests, including bulk issue orders, please visit our website at Workforce.com/products or email hcmalerts@e-circ.net.


Editorial:
To submit an article for publication, go to Workforce.com/contribute/submission-guidelines. Letters to the editor may be sent to editors@workforce.com.

List Rental:
Contact Mike Rovello at (402) 836-5639 or Mike.Rovello@infogroup.com.


Permissions and Article Reprints:
No part of Workforce can be reproduced without written permission. All permissions to republish or distribute content from Workforce can be obtained through PARS International. For single article reprints in quantities of 250 and above and e-prints for Web posting, please contact PARS International at MediaTecReprints@parsintl.com.

Subscription Services:All orders, inquiries and address changes should be addressed to

Workforce
P.O. Box 8712
Lowell, MA 01853

or call customer service at (800) 422-2681, email us at hcmalerts@e-circ.net or visit Workforce.com/subscribe.

Please provide both the old and new address as printed on the last label at least six weeks before the change. The first copy of a new subscription will be mailed within eight weeks of receipt of order. Missing issues must be claimed within six months after publication.


Subscriptions are free to qualified individuals within the U.S. and Canada. Nonqualified paid subscriptions are available for $199 annually for 6 issues. All countries outside the U.S. and Canada must be prepaid in U.S. funds with an additional $33 postage surcharge. Single copy price is $29.99.

Last Word

Rick Bell

Workforce's Last Word author, Rick Bell.

A History Lesson for #FixItSHRM Followers

A History Lesson for #FixItSHRM Followers

N

early a decade ago a well-intentioned group of HR leaders banded together to dispute several Society for Human Resource Management policies.

Not just some radical fringe group, the SHRM Members for Transparency questioned issues tarnishing the organization’s integrity, from doubling board members’ annual honoraria to allowing reimbursement for business-class travel to wanting more board members who carried HR credentials.

These veteran HR leaders had the pull to garner media attention as well as that of SHRM’s membership. And that caught SHRM’s attention. For a while, anyway.

May/June 2019 | Volume 98, Issue 3

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
John R. Taggart
jrtag@workforce.com

PRESIDENT
Kevin A. Simpson
ksimpson@workforce.com

Vice President, GROUP PUBLISHER
Clifford Capone
ccapone@workforce.com

VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF
Mike Prokopeak
mikep@workforce.com

Editorial Director
Rick Bell
rbell@workforce.com

Managing Editor
Ashley St. John
astjohn@workforce.com

ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Andie Burjek
aburjek@workforce.com

Assistant Managing EditoR
Christopher Magnus
cmagnus@workforce.com

EDITORIAL ART DIRECTOR
Theresa Stoodley
tstoodley@workforce.com

EDITORIAL Associates
Eva Mick
emick@workforce.com

Bethany Tomasian
btomasian@workforce.com

Vice President, RESEARCH & Advisory Services
Sarah Kimmel
skimmel@workforce.com

RESEARCH MANAGER
Tim Harnett
tharnett@workforce.com

Data Scientist
Grey Litaker
glitaker@workforce.com

VIDEO AND MULTIMEDIA PRODUCER
Andrew Kennedy Lewis
alewis@workforce.com

Media & Production Manager
Ashley Flora
aflora@workforce.com

VICE PRESIDENT, EVENTS
Trey Smith
tsmith@workforce.com

Events Content editor
Malaz Elsheikh
melsheikh@workforce.com

Webcast Manager
Alec O’Dell
aodell@workforce.com

Events Graphic Designer
Latonya Hampton
lhampton@workforce.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Vince Czarnowski
vince@workforce.com

MARKETING DIRECTOR
Greg Miller
gmiller@workforce.com

Marketing Specialist
Kristen Britt
kbritt@workforce.com

Regional Sales ManagerS
Derek Graham
dgraham@workforce.com

Daniella Weinberg
dweinberg@workforce.com

Director, Business Development 
Kevin Fields
kfields@workforce.com

Digital & Audience Insights Manager
Lauren Wilbur
lwilbur@CLOmedia.com

Digital Coordinator
Steven Diemand
sdiemand@CLOmedia.com

Audience Insights Coordinator
Micaela Martinez
mmartinez@workforce.com

LIST MANAGER
Mike Rovello
hcmlistrentals@infogroup.com

Business Administration Manager
Melanie Lee
mlee@workforce.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Jennifer Benz
Carol Brzozowski
Marc Coleman
Kris Dunn
Sarah Fister Gale
Tim K. Garrett
Jon Hyman
Patty Kujawa
Rita Pyrillis
Mary-Clare Race
Daniel Saeedi
Rachel L. Schaller

WORKFORCE EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Arie Ball, Vice President, Sourcing and Talent Acquisition, Sodexo
Angela Bailey, Associate Director and Chief Human Capital Officer, U.S. Office of Personnel Management
Kris Dunn, Chief Human Resources Officer, Kinetix, and Founder, Fistful of Talent and HR Capitalist
Curtis Gray, Senior Vice President, Human Resources and Administration, BAE Systems
Jil Greene, Vice President, Human Resources and Community Relations, Harrah’s New Orleans
Ted Hoff, Human Resources Vice President, Global Sales and Sales Incentives, IBM
Tracy Kofski, Vice President, Compensation and Benefits, General Mills
Jon Hyman, Partner, Meyers, Roman, Friedberg & Lewis
Jim McDermid, Vice President, Human Resources, Cardiac and Vascular Group, Medtronic
Randall Moon, Vice President, International HR, Benefits and HRIS, Lowe’s Cos.
Dan Satterthwaite, Head of Human Resources, DreamWorks
Dave Ulrich, Professor, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan

Workforce (ISSN 2331-2793) is published bi-monthly by MediaTec Publishing Inc., 111 E. Wacker Dr., Suite 1200, Chicago IL 60601. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Workforce, P.O. Box 8712 Lowell, MA 01853. Subscriptions are free to qualified professionals within the US and Canada. Digital free subscriptions are available worldwide. Nonqualified paid subscriptions are available at the subscription price of $199 for 6 issues. All countries outside the US and Canada must be prepaid in US funds with an additional $33 postage surcharge. Single price copy is $29.99

Workforce and Workforce.com are the trademarks of MediaTec Publishing Inc. Copyright © 2019, MediaTec Publishing Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of material published in Workforce is forbidden without permission.

Printed by: Quad/Graphics, Sussex, WI

Workforce Title
Workforce Title
Free,
Live,
Webinars.
FREE, LIVE, WEBINARS.

Check out what you’ve missed!

April 17

How to Upskill your Workforce for the Digital Future

April 23

Employee Experience Breakthroughs – The HR Technology Shift

Available live on the air date and on-demand for one year after unless otherwise specified. Check them out today and keep the education going!

www.workforce.com/wf-events/

Thanks for reading our May/June 2019 issue!