July/August 2019

July/August 2019

| From Our Editors

Mike Prokopeak, Editor in Chief
Transformation is the word for many in business today.

It’s not hard to understand why. Facing a host of internal and external pressures, many business leaders are spearheading change initiatives as a result. But what some forget as they chart the path forward is that transformation is an exercise of both the head and the heart.

That’s why HR is poised to be a catalyst, bridging the vision for where business needs to go with the empathy needed to help those making it happen.

That’s also why it’s important to recognize the next generation of HR leaders through the annual list of Workforce Game Changers. These emerging leaders play a crucial role in transforming the future of not just HR but of work.

—Mike Prokopeak,
Editor in Chief

The workplace has changed a lot since 1922. That year The Journal of Personnel Research debuted, rebranded later as Personnel Journal and finally Workforce. Now in our 97th year, we take a look back at what was on the minds of past generations of people managers.

A Nuanced Approach to Mental Handicaps, September 1957

The concept of “normal” means different things to different people, according to researcher and writer Silas L. Warner in the article “Spotting the Neurotic and Helping the Maladjusted.” This article was sympathetic toward the plight of employees who are emotionally or mentally ill.

Warner used war-taught lessons to make the argument that people formerly excluded from the workforce can become valuable workers. World War II required that women do manual labor previously done by men and, in some cases, that people recovering from strokes work with different machines. If the stroke impacted the right side of their body, they could depend on left-hand operated machines. If physical handicaps can be overcome this way, so can emotional handicaps, Warner argued.

Let’s first acknowledge that obviously being a woman isn’t a physical handicap. Overlooking that, his argument is pretty progressive. He highlighted a few types of mental or emotional handicaps: paranoia, neuroticism, alcoholism and depression.

As long as the “paranoid” person in question is ultimately harmless, there’s “no psychiatric reason why this person’s job should be taken from him,” Warner wrote. Further, certain jobs require a certain degree of skepticism.

Warner also had a nuanced approach to “neurotics.” Contrary to popular beliefs, he wrote, “[They] are not spoiled weaklings who can’t stand up to what you and I do, but are unhappy individuals, most of whom are productively working.”

Finally, he stressed how much of a medical emergency depression can be, due to the dangers of suicide. He noted that serious depressions occur most frequently in one’s 40s and 50s. That’s a very different narrative than what we hear about now, which is that young people are more likely to experience mental health problems.

Andie Burjek

 

The concept of “normal” means different things to different people, according to researcher and writer Silas L. Warner in the article “Spotting the Neurotic and Helping the Maladjusted.” This article was sympathetic toward the plight of employees who are emotionally or mentally ill.

Warner used war-taught lessons to make the argument that people formerly excluded from the workforce can become valuable workers. World War II required that women do manual labor previously done by men and, in some cases, that people recovering from strokes work with different machines. If the stroke impacted the right side of their body, they could depend on left-hand operated machines. If physical handicaps can be overcome this way, so can emotional handicaps, Warner argued.

Let’s first acknowledge that obviously being a woman isn’t a physical handicap. Overlooking that, his argument is pretty progressive. He highlighted a few types of mental or emotional handicaps: paranoia, neuroticism, alcoholism and depression.

As long as the “paranoid” person in question is ultimately harmless, there’s “no psychiatric reason why this person’s job should be taken from him,” Warner wrote. Further, certain jobs require a certain degree of skepticism.

Warner also had a nuanced approach to “neurotics.” Contrary to popular beliefs, he wrote, “[They] are not spoiled weaklings who can’t stand up to what you and I do, but are unhappy individuals, most of whom are productively working.”

Finally, he stressed how much of a medical emergency depression can be, due to the dangers of suicide. He noted that serious depressions occur most frequently in one’s 40s and 50s. That’s a very different narrative than what we hear about now, which is that young people are more likely to experience mental health problems.

Andie Burjek

The New Workforce, January 1998
From the mid-1920s until December 1997, this publication was known as Personnel Journal. That all changed with the January 1998 issue as the first edition of Workforce rolled off the presses. And like any good publication would in its first appearance, the writers, editors and a series of distinguished panelists made a splash with some bold predictions as they gazed upon 2008.

Panelists ranging from longtime HR tech analyst Jac Fitz-Enz to University of Michigan professor Dave Ulrich to then-McDonald’s Corp. HR director Bob Wilner offered their thoughts in “60 HR Predictions for 2008.” Under the header “Work and Society” – “Just as defined-contribution plans have begun to take over from Social Security, companies will take on responsibility for elder care, long-term care and other social needs through cafeteria-style benefits programs.” In “Definition of Jobs” – “Organizations won’t pay for the value of the job but the value of the person.” And under “Strategic Role of HR” – “Leading change will become HR’s greatest contribution to the corporation.”

One last forecast many wish would come true: “We can all expect to attend fewer meetings in the future.”

Maybe by 2028?

Rick Bell

Game Changers Class of 2019

On The Cover

Changing the Global Game

Pritika Padhi, left, and Dharshana Ramachandran lead an international contingent of the Game Changers Class of 2019.

Cover Photo by Sanket Khuntale

Sector Report

52

Background Checks and Imbalances

A patchwork of regulations and gaggles of gig workers are making the screening process a lot more complicated.

54

The Year of L&D

Executives and employees are clamoring for more training, and learning leaders are happy to oblige.

FEATURES

32

Game Changers Class of 2019

Let’s congratulate 40 people in the HR field who make up the 2019 Workforce Game Changers, domestically and abroad.

34

Globe-trotting Game Changers

From Mumbai to Manama, Nigeria to Norway, these global Game Changers are making a world of difference.

24

Make Way for Generation Z

Cultural change is coming to HR. It’s time to welcome the new kids on the block: Gen Z.

46

Boomer Bingo

With a tight job market and a drain on experience, don’t let baby boomers bail out of the workforce just yet.

Make Way for Generation Z
Boomer Bingo
Boomer Bingo

On The Web

speak up!

The Workforce online community provides you with virtual meeting places to chat about issues and trends affecting you and your workplace.
 

Join the group:
workforce.com/linkedingroup

Columns

4

your force

Transformation Is Growth.

14

WORK IN PROGRESS

Are Your Leaders Credible? Are You Sure?

19

Benefits beat

Is Trust the Biggest Workplace Benefit?

22

THE PRACTICAL EMPLOYER

An FYI on Taking PTO

50

THE LAST WORD

Burnout Is No Fairy Tale.

For Your Benefit

16

AN HSA ‘HOW-TO’

Employers communicating the strategy of pairing a health savings account and retirement benefits.

17

THE AGING MILLENNIAL

Older millennials are seeing increases in the diagnoses of depression, diabetes, high blood pressure and hyperactivity.

17

LOAN DEBT DILEMMA

A matching student-loan plan to ease employees’ financial burden appears to have hit a federal roadblock.

18

Ailing TIME-OFF POLICIES

Whether employees are sick or just need a vacation, companies should consider addressing presenteeism.

Trending

10

CRIMINAL COMPLAINT

Employers are rethinking stances on candidates’ criminal pasts.

11

PEOPLE MOVES; BY THE NUMBERS

Borden names Paulin sr. director of HR; move over, millennials.

12

Q&A

Amy Cappellanti-Wolf is CHRO for Symantec.

12

All Hands on Deck

Volunteerism is sky high at CSAA Insurance Group.

Legal

20

REQUIRED READING

The employee handbook can be a lifesaver or nightmare in court.

21

LEGAL BRIEFINGS

Virtual marketplace; individual vs. class action.

CORRECTIONS
In the May/June Workforce 100 list, Kronos Inc. should be headquartered in Lowell, Massachusetts. Additionally, in By the Numbers on pg. 11, “HR managers” by gender should have its percentages swapped.

Trending

Criminal Past Less a Predictor for Workplace Futures

One oft-arrested CEO is setting the example that employment doesn’t end with felony convictions.

By Carol Brzozowski

A

t Nutrition Solutions, most employees are formerly convicted felons.

Not exactly the type of employee one would expect to find at a trendy lifestyle meal preparation company. But then again, founder and CEO Chris Cavallini was arrested 17 times before he was 18 years old.

Now leading a $10 million company, Cavallini gives others opportunities to move forward despite pasts including felony convictions, homelessness or substance abuses.

Still, Cavallini won’t just hire any convicted felon who applies for a job.

“We look for how has that person has taken responsibility for what has happened in their past and if they are ready to do whatever it is they have to do for it as long as they need to do it to create a better life for themselves and their families,” he said.

PEOPLE
Steve F. CunninghamSteve F. Cunningham
TDIndustries named Steve F. Cunningham as chief people officer. Cunningham will support the growth of a company that has grown to 2,600 partners. His duties will include talent acquisition, employment compensation, benefits, training, succession planning, and safety. He has more than 20 years of executive HR experience.
Maria Gotes Maria Gotes
Cloud computing company Masergy named Maria Gotes as CHRO. Gotes has more than 15 years of experience leading human resources teams, having held senior positions across recruitment, operations and strategic talent development at a number of leading technology companies. She joins Masergy from TriTech Software Systems, where she was SVP of HR.
Vina Leite Vina Leite
Global advertising technology leader The Trade Desk named Vina Leite as chief people officer. Based in Ventura, California, Leite will lead the company’s worldwide human resource strategy and operations. Her team is responsible for developing and managing employee programs to help nurture and grow the unique and special culture at The Trade Desk. She will report directly to CEO and founder Jeff Green.
moves
Darlene Paulin Darlene Paulin
Dairy processor and distributor Borden named Darlene Paulin as senior director of HR. Paulin brings more than 33 years of HR experience, including 25 years in the beverage industry. For the past seven years, she has led the southern region’s HR function at PepsiCo, supporting 5,500 union and non-union employees across eight states, 51 locations and five manufacturing plants.
Mary Raddant Mary Raddant
Affinity Living Group named Mary Raddant VP of HR to help lead the company’s continued growth. Raddant joins ALG after serving as the senior director of human resources for David’s Bridal Inc. Raddant earned a master’s degree in global human resource development from the University of Illinois.
Phil Ulrich Phil Ulrich
Flex named Phil Ulrich as CHRO of the 200,000-employee manufacturing solutions provider with more than 100 locations across 30 countries. Ulrich has helped combine complex organizations, managed global labor strategy and negotiations, onboarded tens of thousands of employees for greenfield plants, and implemented business-centric HR organizations in his previous roles.
To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com.
Include People Moves in the subject line.
PEOPLE moves
PEOPLE moves
PEOPLE
moves
Steve F. Cunningham
Steve F. Cunningham
TDIndustries named Steve F. Cunningham as chief people officer. Cunningham will support the growth of a company that has grown to 2,600 partners. His duties will include talent acquisition, employment compensation, benefits, training, succession planning, and safety. He has more than 20 years of executive HR experience.
Maria Gotes
Maria Gotes
Cloud computing company Masergy named Maria Gotes as CHRO. Gotes has more than 15 years of experience leading human resources teams, having held senior positions across recruitment, operations and strategic talent development at a number of leading technology companies. She joins Masergy from TriTech Software Systems, where she was SVP of HR.
Vina Leite
Vina Leite
Global advertising technology leader The Trade Desk named Vina Leite as chief people officer. Based in Ventura, California, Leite will lead the company’s worldwide human resource strategy and operations. Her team is responsible for developing and managing employee programs to help nurture and grow the unique and special culture at The Trade Desk. She will report directly to CEO and founder Jeff Green.
Darlene Paulin
Darlene Paulin
Dairy processor and distributor Borden named Darlene Paulin as senior director of HR. Paulin brings more than 33 years of HR experience, including 25 years in the beverage industry. For the past seven years, she has led the southern region’s HR function at PepsiCo, supporting 5,500 union and non-union employees across eight states, 51 locations and five manufacturing plants.
Mary Raddant
Mary Raddant
Affinity Living Group named Mary Raddant VP of HR to help lead the company’s continued growth. Raddant joins ALG after serving as the senior director of human resources for David’s Bridal Inc. Raddant earned a master’s degree in global human resource development from the University of Illinois.
Phil Ulrich
Phil Ulrich
Flex named Phil Ulrich as CHRO of the 200,000-employee manufacturing solutions provider with more than 100 locations across 30 countries. Ulrich has helped combine complex organizations, managed global labor strategy and negotiations, onboarded tens of thousands of employees for greenfield plants, and implemented business-centric HR organizations in his previous roles.
To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com.
Include People Moves in the subject line.
Workforce May/June 2019 - By the Numbers

Trending

Amy Cappellanti-Wolf, CHRO

Strength in Diversity

Bethany Tomasian

Amy Cappellanti-Wolf is the chief human resource officer for global cybersecurity and defense company Symantec. Cappellanti-Wolf has extensive experience in the consumer and tech sectors, having worked companies such as Pepsi, Disney and Cisco Systems. Cappellanti-Wolf spoke with Workforce Editorial Associate Bethany Tomasian on diversity as a driving force for a successful business operations model.

Workforce: How does diversity fit into Symantec’s business strategy?

Amy Cappellanti-Wolf: I believe that diversity is an important business driver. Symantec is located in more than 42 countries around the world, and if you’re going to be a global company you need to have an employee population that reflects the different geographies of your customers. You need different ways to operate and go to market and you aren’t going to be able to do that with a homogeneous employee base. You need people that bring different perspectives and experiences into the business. Diversity is a critical enabler for the business to be successful.

Trending

All Hands on Deck

By Bethany Tomasian
S

core a perfect 100 for corporate social responsibility.

CSAA Insurance Group announced that the company achieved a 100 percent employee volunteerism rate in 2018.

All 3,800 employees, including executive leadership, donated a total of 47,045 hours through the company’s 609 volunteer events across the United States. The hours employees spent volunteering represented about $1.16 million, according to company officials. Some of the volunteer projects supported nonprofit organizations such as American Heart Association, Habitat for Humanity, Junior Achievement and The Crayon Initiative.

The AAA insurer is based in Walnut Creek, California, and provides AAA-branded insurance to 23 states and the District of Columbia. It originally set a corporate goal in 2012 to achieve 80 percent volunteerism participation among its employees, said Senior Manager of Community Affairs Vanessa Chan. The company did not initially aspire to have all of its employees participate in the volunteer program, she said.

Trending

3 Ways to Cultivate a Global Business Mindset

By China Gorman

China Gorman
I

n today’s increasingly connected and international marketplace, HR professionals who have a strong understanding of global dynamics are going to have an advantage. The question I hear often is “How do I develop that global mindset?”

Many people in HR assume they can’t travel abroad and build valuable global knowledge unless their company sends them on an official work trip overseas. The reality is that you can take that initiative yourself and learn to become an effective global leader — whether you travel abroad regularly or not — and there’s a good chance your employer will take notice if you do.

Develop global relationships online: No matter what function you’re in within an organization, there’s a global community you can join via Facebook, LinkedIn or a professional association. These online communities are excellent ways to connect with your peers in other parts of the world and start meaningful conversations.

Trending

Workforce Acquired

Australian tech entrepreneur buys Workforce magazine and Workforce.com.

A

group led by Australian technology entrepreneur Tasmin Trezise acquired Chicago-based Human Capital Media, the parent company of business-to-business publications Workforce, Chief Learning Officer and Talent Economy.

Trezise, 26, is the co-owner of Brisbane, Australia-based Tanda, a 7-year-old technology firm that produces time and attendance software.

“I look forward to working with the team as we continue to uphold the dignity, research and empowerment of the working man and woman and promote the world standard in workforce management,” Trezise said.

The Human Capital Media entities will operate separately from Tanda with a shared ownership, said Trezise, who will be president of Workforce, a multimedia publication that covers the intersection of people management and business strategy. Kevin Simpson will remain president of all other Human Capital Media properties, Trezise said.

Trending

Workforce's Work in Progress author Kris Dunn.
Are Your Leaders Credible? Are You Sure?

By Kris Dunn | Work in Progress

L

et’s talk about something that impacts every organization: the perception of whether your executives do anything, and in a related topic, whether they are viewed as credible.

Every organization is impacted by this. You can have great executive talent executing at a high level but if they do it 60 hours a week from floor 37 and never connect with your employee base, the perception can become “What do these people do?”

There are four buckets every executive falls into:

  1. Works hard/does stuff; viewed as credible.
  2. Doesn’t work hard/does stuff; is viewed as credible.
  3. Does stuff/works hard; isn’t viewed as credible.
  4. Doesn’t work hard/do stuff; isn’t viewed as credible.

The gold standard is to have execs in No. 1 — does stuff/is credible. Engagement is always easier when this is the case. For the most cynical of executives, they’d love to be viewed as credible without really trying to dig in or understand what’s going on several levels below them.

For Your Benefit

Pairing HSAs and Retirement Benefits a Growing Strategy
Focus has shifted to maximizing employees’ investment opportunities.
By Patty Kujawa
E

ven though health savings accounts have been around for nearly 16 years, employers are still having a tough time getting employees to understand the vehicle’s triple tax benefit in saving dollars today for health care costs tomorrow.

Employee education was the top concern for nearly 62 percent of employers in a newly released survey on HSAs by the Plan Sponsor Council of America. There was a significant difference between education and administration concerns, which ranked second at just under 16 percent.

People often confuse HSAs with flexible savings accounts, said Kenneth Forsythe, head of product strategy for Empower Retirement. Forsythe was part of a panel of experts speaking at the PSCA national conference in May. Part of the reason for the confusion is the number of acronym-rich savings accounts that can accompany high-deductible health care accounts, and that employers typically only talk about HSAs during open enrollment, he added.

Focus has shifted to maximizing employees’ investment opportunities

The survey backed that up by showing that 76 percent of plan sponsors only offer HSA education during open enrollment. Only 21 percent offer education at different times during the year. Group presentations were the most popular education resource (59.9 percent), followed by HSA “how-to” guides (56.6 percent), and flyers (45.1 percent).

For Your Benefit

The Aging Millennial
Mental health a growing concern.
By Rita Pyrillis
M

illennials are the driving force behind the booming wellness industry, embracing trends from meditation and holistic medicine to the latest tech gadgets and gear. Yet a growing number are facing middle age with more health problems than previous generations, according to recent studies.

In particular, older millennials — those between the ages of 34 and 36 — are seeing dramatic increases in the diagnoses of depression, diabetes, high blood pressure and hyperactivity, among other conditions, according to a new study of medical claims by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Health Index. A third of millennials have health conditions that reduce their quality of life and life expectancy, making them more likely than Generation X to be sicker when they’re older, the study showed.

The findings do not surprise Rachel Druckenmiller, 34, a wellness industry leader whose fast-track career nearly came to a halt when she was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease in 2017. She is a 2019 Workforce Game Changer and director of well-being at the Alera Group, a national insurance and financial services firm.

For Your Benefit

Student-Loan Matching Hits Snags
Some gray areas seen as potentially ripe for abuse.
By Patty Kujawa
Some gray areas seen as potentially ripe for abuse
P

lan sponsors have shown a lot of interest in a recent ruling that allowed one company to make 401(k) matching contributions while employees repay their student loans, but two attorneys following the progress of the idea are doubtful that federal guidance allowing others to implement the idea will be issued any time soon.

In August 2018, the Internal Revenue Service issued a private letter ruling allowing an unnamed company to amend its plan so workers who voluntarily agree to put at least 2 percent of pay toward a student loan would be eligible to receive an employer contribution equal to 5 percent of pay to their 401(k) plan.

That letter addressed the issue facing 44 million graduates today: the $1.5 trillion they carry in student loan debt. Organizations also are seeing a rapid rise in popularity for plans that ease the loan burdens of recent grads.

Since that time, the IRS has met with trade groups to talk about possible federal guidance, said David Levine, a principal at Groom Law Group who was speaking at the Plan Sponsor Council of America’s national conference in April.

For Your Benefit

Experts Advise Revising Ailing Time-Off Policies
Whether employees are sick or in need of vacation, presenteeism should be addressed.
By Andie Burjek
P

resenteeism is heralded as a big problem in business as it’s something that can decrease an individual’s productivity or affect that of their co-workers as well.

Presenteeism, which is chiefly defined as employees who are not functioning at maximum capability due to illness, injury or another condition, could be helped if employees took time off when sick or vacation days to unwind. But the issue is not that simple. Reasons for presenteeism depend on many factors, whether it’s an individual’s attitude toward work, an employer’s workplace culture or the overall economic environment.

Employees taking time off bottomed out during the Great Recession. Over the past decade, the numbers haven’t recovered, said Steve Koepp, former Time Inc. editor and founder of From Day One, a Brooklyn-based conference series focused on creating a more collaborative, empathetic and productive workplace.

For Your Benefit

Jennifer Benz
Trust — the Biggest Workplace Benefit?

By Jennifer Benz | Benefits Beat

E

mployers are a trusted source of information. Trust could even be the most important unnoticed benefit in any workplace. For years I have strongly believed that trust is a key ingredient to any successful workplace, and two recent studies confirm it in ways that surprised even me.

First, the Edelman Trust Barometer has followed trust around the world for 19 years. The 2019 survey included more than 33,000 people around the globe, and it shows some significant changes from previous years. The summary report says “Trust has changed profoundly in the past year — people have shifted their trust to the relationships within their control, most notably their employers.”

Around the world, 75 percent of people say they trust “my employer” to do what is right. Compare that with the percentage who say the same about NGOs (57 percent), business (56 percent), and the media (47 percent). But that’s not the most interesting finding.

Legal

Employee Handbook: Lifesaver or Nightmare?
Few tools are as important and oft-neglected as the employee handbook.
By Michelle Anderson
W

hen done correctly, employee handbooks can be great tools for employers.

But often employers treat them like a meal simmering in a crockpot: set it and forget it. Creating a handbook, particularly for employers in multiple states, is a major undertaking.

Many employers do not give their employee handbooks the attention they need and deserve. Some cobble together a collection of policies borrowed from the internet or other businesses that may not only fail to reflect their actual business practices, but may also run afoul of state, federal or local laws.

Some businesses delegate the task of creating an employee handbook to someone with little or no experience in human resources, and the handbook turns into a glorified “how-to” manual for submitting expense reports and timesheets, with a few personnel policies thrown in.

Legal Briefings

TESTING: CONTRACTORS IN THE VIRTUAL MARKETPLACE
Recognizing the proliferation of virtual marketplace companies (VMC) like Uber and TaskRabbit, the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor issued an opinion letter applying the six-factor test to evaluate whether a service provider is an employee or independent contractor.

Control: The service provider has the flexibility to choose if, when, where, how and for whom they will work. The VMC lacks oversight concerning the quality of the service provided.

Permanency: The service provider is engaged on a project-by-project basis and is free to accept work from a competitor of the VMC. There are limited grounds upon which a service provider can be terminated.

Investment: The service provider invests their own money in the facilities, equipment or helpers needed to provide services on the VMC’s platform.

Legal

The Practical Employer author, Jon Hyman.
An FYI on Taking PTO

Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer

An FYI on Taking PTO

By Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer

M

y family and I recently spent eight days in Italy. My kids (ages 10 and 12) each year get the last two weeks of March off school. This year, we decided to spend our spring break in Rome and Florence. It was a whirlwind tour.

We covered a lot of ground — per my Apple Watch, 63 miles and 140,000 steps, to be precise. And we saw a lot of stuff — the Vatican, the Colosseum, lots of beautiful churches, lots of ancient sites and ruins, lots of famous works of art, and (almost) too much pizza, pasta and gelato (but never too much vino rosso). It was completely glorious. If you’ve never been, you are ordered to starting booking your trip now.

Some people live to work; I work to live, and part of that living is time off for travel. There are so many places in the world to experience, and it brings me so much joy to be able to share those experiences with my family.

Move Over, ‘Net Kids,’
Gen Z Has Arrived
Cultural change is coming to HR as the post-millennial generation enters the workforce. It’s time to welcome those new kids on the block: Generation Z.
By Bethany Tomasian
N

early two decades ago Workforce published the article, “Ready or Not, Here Come the Net Kids.” The story highlighted the entrepreneurial exploits of several youthful tech whiz kids including then-17-year-old Michael Furdyk, who had already co-founded and was about to sell his first dot-com, mydesktop.com, before starting up his second company, buybuddy.co.

Furdyk was one of many faces among this new breed of tech entrepreneur. He was also among those christened as the “Net Kids,” although that term didn’t stick long. They soon became widely known as Generation Y and today they’re the millennials, arguably the most researched generation ever.

They heralded a new generation entering the workforce, bringing their technical acumen and entrepreneurial spirit, and they developed a reputation — deserved or not — for craving attention and being team-oriented. They’ve since grown up (Furdyk is now 36) and like generations before them now own homes, have families and run companies. And like their predecessors, Generation X, the millennials are giving way to the next generation of “net kids.”

Also known as Digital Natives and the iGeneration, it’s time to welcome Generation Z to the workforce.

There are some 74 million so-called Digital Natives in the United States. Going by the Forbes definition of a Gen Zer as being born between 1995 and 2010, the oldest among them turns 24 this year and the development of their career paths is already underway. Leadership should be prepared to manage this new generation of young adults who, much like the millennials, are set to change the face of the workforce.

Move Over, ‘Net Kids,’
Gen Z Has Arrived
Cultural change is coming to HR as the post-millennial generation enters the workforce. It’s time to welcome those new kids on the block: Generation Z.
By Bethany Tomasian
N

early two decades ago Workforce published the article, “Ready or Not, Here Come the Net Kids.” The story highlighted the entrepreneurial exploits of several youthful tech whiz kids including then-17-year-old Michael Furdyk, who had already co-founded and was about to sell his first dot-com, mydesktop.com, before starting up his second company, buybuddy.co.

Furdyk was one of many faces among this new breed of tech entrepreneur. He was also among those christened as the “Net Kids,” although that term didn’t stick long. They soon became widely known as Generation Y and today they’re the millennials, arguably the most researched generation ever.

They heralded a new generation entering the workforce, bringing their technical acumen and entrepreneurial spirit, and they developed a reputation — deserved or not — for craving attention and being team-oriented. They’ve since grown up (Furdyk is now 36) and like generations before them now own homes, have families and run companies. And like their predecessors, Generation X, the millennials are giving way to the next generation of “net kids.”

Also known as Digital Natives and the iGeneration, it’s time to welcome Generation Z to the workforce.

There are some 74 million so-called Digital Natives in the United States. Going by the Forbes definition of a Gen Zer as being born between 1995 and 2010, the oldest among them turns 24 this year and the development of their career paths is already underway. Leadership should be prepared to manage this new generation of young adults who, much like the millennials, are set to change the face of the workforce.

Net Kids
Sponsored Content
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Talent Activation
Unpacking Skills Throughout the Employment Lifecycle
By Adina Sapp
With unemployment rates at record lows, employers are looking to strategically capture the untapped skills of their current workforce rather than seeking new talent elsewhere. The year 2018 closed with an unemployment rate of 3.9% — the lowest it’s been since 2000. Prior to 2000, the rate hadn’t been that low since 1969.1 Business growth is difficult when the unemployment rate is this low. Companies looking to expand their workforce have difficulty finding good workers because the talent simply isn’t available.

Even when new talent can be found, hiring and firing is expensive. As Mike Prokopeak, editor in chief of Chief Learning Officer, put it, “It has always been more expensive to find talent to fill gaps. It may be more advantageous to develop the people who are already in your workforce.” The law of supply and demand means it is difficult to find good employees, and so employers want to retain the ones they have and provide them with the skills the company needs.

This is where organizations like DeVryWORKS come in. DeVryWORKS is the partnership team of DeVry University and works with employers to transform talent development. It does this by breaking traditional university coursework into effective online, collaborative modules that provide a workable skill set more tangibly than a traditional university course of study.

Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content
Six Things We Know About Effective Leadership
By Ryne A. Sherman, Hogan Assessment Systems

The fate of any organization is critically dependent upon its leadership.1 Organizations with effective leaders repeatedly outperform organizations with ineffective leaders. Economists estimate that CEOs account for between 17-30% of the variance in firm financial performance.2 However, organizations are notoriously bad when it comes to identifying effective leaders. In fact, a recent Gallup poll found that 85% of the global workforce is either not engaged or actively disengaged at work, and that is the result of poor leadership.3 There are many reasons for the persistence of bad leadership, but three of them stand out among the rest. First, when choosing leaders, organizations succumb to the allure of charming employees who are skilled at playing corporate politics to advance their own careers. Second, organizations tend to rely more on gut and intuition when it comes to staffing decisions, rather than making decisions grounded in science. Third, organizations don’t know what competencies are required to be an effective leader.

So, what does effective leadership look like? Unfortunately, you won’t find the answers in the leadership section of your local bookstore; those shelves are filled with personal and historical anecdotes that don’t generalize beyond their specific situations. The systemic and scientific study of leadership effectiveness, on the other hand, has identified common competencies of highly effective leaders. In this article, I describe the six scientifically supported competencies of effective leaders.

INTEGRITY. Effective leaders have integrity. Integrity builds trust. Trust is the foundation for every relationship. If you don’t trust your spouse, divorce is inevitable. If you don’t trust your business partner, your business is doomed. If you don’t trust your boss, you might as well start updating your resume. Effective leaders build trust by keeping their word, not playing favorites.

GOOD-DECISION MAKING. Effective leaders make good decisions in a timely fashion. This does not mean they always make the right decision. It means that they base their decisions on the best data available and don’t spend unnecessary time and energy overthinking those decisions. Ineffective leaders tend to make decisions that are irrational or illogical and/or make decisions very slowly. Both drive their teams crazy, and lead to dissatisfaction and disengagement.

TECHNICAL COMPETENCE. Effective leaders have technical competence in at least some aspects of the organization. Nobody expects a leader to know everything, but they ought to have some technical knowledge of whatever they are overseeing. Science professors want their Dean of Science to be a scientist, as opposed to an expert in contemporary literature. Designers want their director to have formal training in design principles. Football players want their coach to have had experience playing football. Having technical competence gives the leader credibility. No one will listen to a leader who lacks credibility.

Game Changers
Game
Changers,
Assemble!
Nine years strong with new HR heroes answering the call.
B

ecause of an influx of impressive entries Workforce has named 40 winners, making this the first “40 under 40” list of HR Game Changers.

This year touts a variety of winners in different industries. One honoree is known as a “trailblazer within the transit industry” by his peers. Another decided to address sexual harassment in a truly creative way by creating a harassment-training comic book. And another pursued a diversity and inclusion program that did more than just “check the box,” allowing employees to get quality, actionable diversity training.

We’ve also received nominations for human resources practitioners spanning the globe, from Nigeria to India to France to Norway to Bahrain. These winners allow us to explore HR issues outside of the United States and what the most determined HR professionals in these countries are doing to address these issues. Five of their experiences are shared in this special 2019 package, creating a more detailed picture of HR internationally and those who are changing the game.

Congratulations to Workforce’s 2019 class of Game Changers!

Game
Changers,
Assemble!
Nine years strong with new HR heroes answering the call.
B

ecause of an influx of impressive entries Workforce has named 40 winners, making this the first “40 under 40” list of HR Game Changers.

This year touts a variety of winners in different industries. One honoree is known as a “trailblazer within the transit industry” by his peers. Another decided to address sexual harassment in a truly creative way by creating a harassment-training comic book. And another pursued a diversity and inclusion program that did more than just “check the box,” allowing employees to get quality, actionable diversity training.

We’ve also received nominations for human resources practitioners spanning the globe, from Nigeria to India to France to Norway to Bahrain. These winners allow us to explore HR issues outside of the United States and what the most determined HR professionals in these countries are doing to address these issues. Five of their experiences are shared in this special 2019 package, creating a more detailed picture of HR internationally and those who are changing the game.

Congratulations to Workforce’s 2019 class of Game Changers!

Globe-trotting
Game Changers
From Mumbai to Manama, Nigeria to Norway, these global Game Changers are making a world of difference in people management.
By Andie Burjek
A

s a U.S.-based publication, it’s logical for Workforce to dig deep into human resources issues that confront American companies, but there’s quite literally a whole other world of HR challenges out there. And these global Game Changers are using their expertise to make a difference internationally.

While the program recognizes up-and-coming young talent in people management, 2019 is first year in Game Changer history that the awards are a true 40-under-40 list, partly thanks to the many outstanding international entries. These 10 winners come from six different countries — Bahrain, Canada, France, India, Nigeria and Norway — and each dealt with the unique problems in their company and country in impressive ways.

Employee Angst and Analytics in India
Pritika Padhi made quite the impression in the 2019 Game Changer awards. Padhi, team leader — talent management at L&T Financial Services in Mumbai, India, has had many major HR wins even before assuming her current role in May 2019. She was nominated by her former employer, Reliance Industries Ltd., one of India’s largest private sector organizations, for her accomplishments in the role of lead — talent management.

Before Reliance, Padhi was an HR professional at K12 Techno Services Pvt. Ltd., an organization that runs school chains. She was hired to put new initiatives in place, but knew she needed to address a much more vital problem before any of these initiatives could be successful. That issue was “angst” among school employees. Their grievances weren’t being addressed, causing dissatisfaction.

Globe-trotting
Game Changers
From Mumbai to Manama, Nigeria to Norway, these global Game Changers are making a world of difference in people management.
By Andie Burjek
A

s a U.S.-based publication, it’s logical for Workforce to dig deep into human resources issues that confront American companies, but there’s quite literally a whole other world of HR challenges out there. And these global Game Changers are using their expertise to make a difference internationally.

While the program recognizes up-and-coming young talent in people management, 2019 is first year in Game Changer history that the awards are a true 40-under-40 list, partly thanks to the many outstanding international entries. These 10 winners come from six different countries — Bahrain, Canada, France, India, Nigeria and Norway — and each dealt with the unique problems in their company and country in impressive ways.

Employee Angst and Analytics in India
Pritika Padhi made quite the impression in the 2019 Game Changer awards. Padhi, team leader — talent management at L&T Financial Services in Mumbai, India, has had many major HR wins even before assuming her current role in May 2019. She was nominated by her former employer, Reliance Industries Ltd., one of India’s largest private sector organizations, for her accomplishments in the role of lead — talent management.

Before Reliance, Padhi was an HR professional at K12 Techno Services Pvt. Ltd., an organization that runs school chains. She was hired to put new initiatives in place, but knew she needed to address a much more vital problem before any of these initiatives could be successful. That issue was “angst” among school employees. Their grievances weren’t being addressed, causing dissatisfaction.

Game Changers
Game Changers Logo
Bilal Ali, 30
Head of HR, Sharif Group
Manama, Bahrain
At the age of 27, Ali become head of HR at the Sharif Group. In the past three years, he has continually proven his leadership skills while also maintaining a humble attitude and vouching for employee rights.
Bilal Ali
Alycia Angle, 31
Senior Talent Management Consultant, Ochsner Health System
New Orleans
Angle served as a student assistant for the Principles and Practices of Performance Improvement Workshop and played a major role as a volunteer coordinator. Angle oversaw the progress of the workshop and conference as she devoted 14-16 hours a day to ensure their success.
With a tight job market and a drain on experience, baby boomers can help employers fill out the winning workplace card.

By Tanya Axenson

I

t’s no secret that the retirement of baby boomers is contributing to a shortage of workers.

Recent reports show that the United States is predicted to see a 38 percent increase in the over-65 population between 2015 and 2025, while the U.S. population of those between ages 18 and 64 is only expected to rise by 3 percent. Baby boomers are estimated to comprise 15 percent of the total global population, according to a resource on website employmentcounselor.net.

Around the world, employers are trying to retain these tenured resources with creative incentives. Some countries are increasing wages, and others are increasing retirement ages.

At the same time, companies are finding that the work styles of baby boomers are changing. After long careers spent largely working as traditional, full-time employees, many in this generation are shying away from retirement and are instead looking for smaller, more flexible work as contractors or consultants. In a tight labor market, this shift can be a significant opportunity for employers desiring the deep level of subject matter expertise, hard and soft skills, and management experience that boomers carry.

Boomers’ preference to continue working can be a big win for any company. To keep this generation in the workforce, however, companies will have to embrace several basic approaches to improve worker engagement. These approaches include creating flexible schedules and engagement models, partnering with senior workers in their career progression, and empowering senior workers with technology.

With a tight job market and a drain on experience, baby boomers can help employers fill out the winning workplace card.

By Tanya Axenson

I

t’s no secret that the retirement of baby boomers is contributing to a shortage of workers.

Recent reports show that the United States is predicted to see a 38 percent increase in the over-65 population between 2015 and 2025, while the U.S. population of those between ages 18 and 64 is only expected to rise by 3 percent. Baby boomers are estimated to comprise 15 percent of the total global population, according to a resource on website employmentcounselor.net.

Around the world, employers are trying to retain these tenured resources with creative incentives. Some countries are increasing wages, and others are increasing retirement ages.

At the same time, companies are finding that the work styles of baby boomers are changing. After long careers spent largely working as traditional, full-time employees, many in this generation are shying away from retirement and are instead looking for smaller, more flexible work as contractors or consultants. In a tight labor market, this shift can be a significant opportunity for employers desiring the deep level of subject matter expertise, hard and soft skills, and management experience that boomers carry.

Boomers’ preference to continue working can be a big win for any company. To keep this generation in the workforce, however, companies will have to embrace several basic approaches to improve worker engagement. These approaches include creating flexible schedules and engagement models, partnering with senior workers in their career progression, and empowering senior workers with technology.

Background Check Providers

Background Screening Gets Even Harder
Patchwork regulations and gig economy workers are making the employment screening process a lot more complicated.
By Sarah Fister Gale
R

emember when “ban the box” was the worst part of the background screening process? Welcome to pay-equity laws.

This new regulatory trend, which is gaining steam even faster than Ban the Box, prevents employers from asking about candidates’ prior salary history in an effort to eliminate gender-based salary disparities.

Both regulatory trends have noble goals, but their implementations have been confoundingly complex. “It has become another patchwork law, that is applied differently in different states, cities and municipalities,” said Dawn Standerwick, vice president of strategic growth for Employment Screening Resources.

In some cases, state or city rules conflict with federal rules, and the adoption and interpretation of these rules and how to comply with them is changing constantly.

Training Providers

The Year of Learning and Development
Executives and employees are clamoring for more training, and learning leaders are more than happy to oblige.

By Sarah Fister Gale

I

t’s a good year for learning leaders and their vendors.

After decades of fighting for budgets and justifying their existence, these L&D professionals are finally getting the respect and resources they deserve. Almost of half of learning leaders report that in 2019 their budgets are increasing, 77 percent say they are adding staff, and 82 percent say their executives actively support efforts to engage employees in professional development.

This is translating into larger investments in learning content and platforms, and more conversations about the link between learning and business outcomes, said David Mallon, vice president and chief analyst, Bersin, Deloitte Consulting. “The C-suite is finally catching up to what they have always intuitively understood but never addressed,” he said. “That learning and performance are two sides of the same coin.”

Learning leaders are also facing increasing pressure to address the ballooning skills gap in the workplace and to create a culture where employees are constantly building new skills. Fully 85 percent of companies report that they are ‘reskilling their workforce’ — and more than half say they are either doing this to a significant extent or that they plan to in the future, according to data from APQC.

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Clifford Capone
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Last Word

Rick Bell

Workforce's Last Word author, Rick Bell.

Burnout Is No Fairy Tale

Burnout Is No Fairy Tale

O

nce upon a time there was a king who ruled over his subjects in the land of Conscientiousness. This king was extremely concerned about his subjects’ safety and serenity. But as you can imagine, ruling over a kingdom like Conscientiousness came with great responsibility.

So dependable and conscientious was our king that every morning he would rise before dawn, enter the Chamber of Contentment, rub his hands with perseverance powder from the Mines of Meticulousness and dutifully crank the Lever of Loyalty so that the sun would rise.

No matter how conscientious we are, no one — king, subject or perfidious prince — is immune from the dangers of sinking into Burnout Bog.

The king would then toddle off and tend to the kingdom’s business. As evening neared, the king would drop his debate with the Duke of Diligence or reschedule a rap with the Regents of Respect, hop off the Throne of Thoroughness and scurry back to the Chamber of Contentment, rub his hands with perseverance powder from the Mines of Meticulousness and dutifully crank the Lever of Loyalty — this time assuring that the sun would set.

July/August 2019 | Volume 98, Issue 4

PRESIDENT
Tasmin Trezise
tasmin@workforce.com

Vice President, GROUP PUBLISHER
Clifford Capone
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VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF
Mike Prokopeak
mikep@workforce.com

Editorial Director
Rick Bell
rbell@workforce.com

Managing Editor
Ashley St. John
astjohn@workforce.com

ASSOCIATE EDITORS
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EDITORIAL ART DIRECTOR
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Vice President, RESEARCH & Advisory Services
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skimmel@workforce.com

RESEARCH MANAGER
Tim Harnett
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Grey Litaker
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VIDEO AND MULTIMEDIA PRODUCER
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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Michelle Anderson
Tanya Axenson
Jennifer Benz
Carol Brzozowski
Kris Dunn
Sarah Fister Gale
Jon Hyman
Patty Kujawa
Rita Pyrillis
Daniel Saeedi
Rachel L. Schaller

WORKFORCE EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Arie Ball, Vice President, Sourcing and Talent Acquisition, Sodexo
Angela Bailey, Associate Director and Chief Human Capital Officer, U.S. Office of Personnel Management
Kris Dunn, Chief Human Resources Officer, Kinetix, and Founder, Fistful of Talent and HR Capitalist
Curtis Gray, Senior Vice President, Human Resources and Administration, BAE Systems
Jil Greene, Vice President, Human Resources and Community Relations, Harrah’s New Orleans
Ted Hoff, Human Resources Vice President, Global Sales and Sales Incentives, IBM
Tracy Kofski, Vice President, Compensation and Benefits, General Mills
Jon Hyman, Partner, Meyers, Roman, Friedberg & Lewis
Jim McDermid, Vice President, Human Resources, Cardiac and Vascular Group, Medtronic
Randall Moon, Vice President, International HR, Benefits and HRIS, Lowe’s Cos.
Dan Satterthwaite, Head of Human Resources, DreamWorks
Dave Ulrich, Professor, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan

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