July/August 2018

July/August 2018

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| From Our Editors

Tragedy struck when a 19-year-old former student opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, killing three staff members and 14 students on the 14th of February 2018.

The sound of those shots continues to reverberate. Fueled by sorrow, anger and, yes, social media, a group of teenage students committed themselves to making a change and organized a nationwide movement to tackle gun violence.

As our feature story on page 44 chronicles, it also echoes into HR. In Coral Springs, one of the communities served by Stoneman Douglas, HR leaders immediately set up services to support city employees called on to respond to the shooting.

As we highlight Workforce Game Changers, the next generation of HR talent, I can’t think of two better examples to exemplify the power of positive change in the face of challenge.

—Mike Prokopeak,
Editor in Chief

The workplace has changed a lot since 1922. That year The Journal of Personnel Research debuted, rebranded later as Personnel Journal and finally Workforce. Now in our 96th year, we take a look back at what was on the minds of past generations of people managers.

Employee Wellness in the 1930s, OCTOBER 1935

Employers were interested in monitoring their employees’ health and diets well before the wellness kick of the 21st century.

Industrial hygiene specialist Frederick B. Flinn explained the implications of several diet and fatigue studies in “Diets and Efficiency” in Personnel Journal’s October 1935 issue. He concluded that more sleep is better for productivity and went into great detail about how an employee’s food consumption impacted their productivity — that is, at what time they ate meals, how much they ate per meal and how many meals they consumed per day. While today’s employers say their interest in wellness initiatives has business and personal concerns, in 1935, workplace health initiatives seemed much more business-oriented. It was suggested that “fatigue” should be replaced by “impairment of productivity.”

The issue also featured an article called “Pow-wow vs. Conference” about how the personnel man could learn a lot about organizing a meeting from the Indian medicine man. Writer Preseley W. Melton put meetings in two categories: a formal committee meeting, or a “harangue,” and a general mass meeting, or a “pow-wow.” Finally, it featured an article about widespread unemployment for the college-educated American and how it spurred student discontent. “Disillusioned and embittered, some of them have rallied to the banners of leaders who promise to reorganize the economy,” author W.H. Cowley wrote. Consider that in 1935, global powers cited as examples were Nazi Germany and fascist Italy.

Andie Burjek

The Rise of the Millennials, FEBRUARY 2000

Before they were known as Generation Y or hung with the moniker of millennials, they were branded the Net Generation. Obviously that did not stick but “Ready or Not, Here Come the Net Kids” profiled several 18- and 19-year-olds at the vanguard of what we call the millennial generation in the February 2000 issue of Workforce. “The latest entrants into corporate America were raised in the Information Age [their capitalization, not mine] — and will test HR’s capacity for cultural change,” wrote Charlene Marmer Solomon.

And thus began the angst and hand-wringing over incorporating this new generation of employees into the workplace as the new millennium dawned. HR’s challenge with the Net Kids? “Given the role models of this generation, the number of dot-com millionaires under 25 and the world view of this group, they present an interesting array of issues to HR.” And who were these role models? Bill Gates, Michael Dell, Tiger Woods and … Britney Spears.

Also in this issue: A Q&A with then-Southwest Airlines VP of People Libby Sartain, the cover story on office redesign (including the sidebar, “What’s With All This Feng Shui?”), a feature titled “AIDS Threatens Global Business,” and a point-counterpoint on domestic-partner benefits regardless of marital status. Oh, it was also then-editor Allan Halcrow’s farewell issue. Goodbye Allan, hello, Net Generation.

Rick Bell

July/August 2018 | Volume 97, Issue 4

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
John R. Taggart
jrtag@workforce.com

PRESIDENT
Kevin A. Simpson
ksimpson@workforce.com

Vice President, GROUP PUBLISHER
Clifford Capone
ccapone@workforce.com

VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF
Mike Prokopeak
mikep@workforce.com

Editorial Director
Rick Bell
rbell@workforce.com

Managing Editor
Ashley St. John
astjohn@workforce.com

SENIOR EDITOR
Lauren Dixon
ldixon@workforce.com

ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Andie Burjek
aburjek@workforce.com

Ave Rio
ario@workforce.com

Assistant Managing EditoR
Christopher Magnus
cmagnus@workforce.com

EDITORIAL ART DIRECTOR
Theresa Stoodley
tstoodley@workforce.com

EDITORIAL Associates
Aysha Ashley Househ
ahouseh@workforce.com

Rocio Villaseñor
rvillasenor@workforce.com

Vice President, RESEARCH & Advisory Services
Sarah Kimmel
skimmel@workforce.com

RESEARCH MANAGER
Tim Harnett
tharnett@workforce.com

Data Scientist
Grey Litaker
glitaker@workforce.com

VIDEO AND MULTIMEDIA PRODUCER
Andrew Kennedy Lewis
alewis@workforce.com

Media & Production Manager
Ashley Flora
aflora@workforce.com

Production Coordinator
Nina Howard
nhoward@workforce.com

VICE PRESIDENT, EVENTS
Trey Smith
tsmith@workforce.com

Events Content editor
Malaz Elsheikh
melsheikh@workforce.com

Webcast Manager
Alec O’Dell
aodell@workforce.com

Events Graphic Designer
Tonya Harris
lharris@workforce.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Vince Czarnowski
vince@workforce.com

Marketing Director
Greg Miller
gmiller@workforce.com

Marketing Specialist
Kristen Britt
kbritt@workforce.com

Regional Sales ManagerS
Derek Graham
dgraham@workforce.com

Robert Stevens
rstevens@workforce.com

Daniella Weinberg
dweinberg@workforce.com

Director, Business Development 
Kevin Fields
kfields@workforce.com

Director, Audience Development
Cindy Cardinal
ccardinal@workforce.com

Digital & Audience Insights Manager
Lauren Lynch
llynch@workforce.com

Digital Coordinator
Mannat Mahtani
mmahtani@workforce.com

LIST MANAGER
Mike Rovello
hcmlistrentals@infogroup.com

Business Administration Manager
Melanie Lee
mlee@workforce.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Jennifer Benz
Carol Brzozowski
Kris Dunn
Sarah Fister Gale
Jon Hyman
Patty Kujawa
John A. MacKenzie
Sasha Poljak
Rita Pyrillis
Daniel Saeedi
Rachel L. Schaller

WORKFORCE EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Arie Ball, Vice President, Sourcing and Talent Acquisition, Sodexo
Angela Bailey, Associate Director and Chief Human Capital Officer, U.S. Office of Personnel Management
Kris Dunn, Chief Human Resources Officer, Kinetix, and Founder, Fistful of Talent and HR Capitalist
Curtis Gray, Senior Vice President, Human Resources and Administration, BAE Systems
Jil Greene, Vice President, Human Resources and Community Relations, Harrah’s New Orleans
Ted Hoff, Human Resources Vice President, Global Sales and Sales Incentives, IBM
Tracy Kofski, Vice President, Compensation and Benefits, General Mills
Jon Hyman, Partner, Meyers, Roman, Friedberg & Lewis
Jim McDermid, Vice President, Human Resources, Cardiac and Vascular Group, Medtronic
Randall Moon, Vice President, International HR, Benefits and HRIS, Lowe’s Cos.
Dan Satterthwaite, Head of Human Resources, DreamWorks
Dave Ulrich, Professor, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan

Workforce (ISSN 2331-2793) is published bi-monthly by MediaTec Publishing Inc., 111 E. Wacker Dr., Suite 1200, Chicago IL 60601. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Workforce, P.O. Box 8712 Lowell, MA 01853. Subscriptions are free to qualified professionals within the US and Canada. Digital free subscriptions are available worldwide. Nonqualified paid subscriptions are available at the subscription price of $199 for 6 issues. All countries outside the US and Canada must be prepaid in US funds with an additional $33 postage surcharge. Single price copy is $29.99

Workforce and Workforce.com are the trademarks of MediaTec Publishing Inc. Copyright © 2017, MediaTec Publishing Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of material published in Workforce is forbidden without permission.

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On The Cover

CHANGING THE TECH GAME


Zackary King of Seattle’s King County is among this year’s Game Changers cutting a swath through the world of HR technology.

COVER PHOTO BY DANIEL BERMAN

Sector Report

48

TOO MANY RULES

How a patchwork of regulations is putting companies at risk with screening vendors trying to help.

50

L&D IS LACKING

Why corporate training hasn’t kept up with today’s learners and what needs to change.

Features

28

GAME CHANGERS CLASS OF 2018

Domestically and internationally, the 2018 Game Changers are standouts and standard-setters in the HR field.

24

OLD AGE ARGUMENT

As tech companies obsess to remain forever young, older workers may be key to the industry’s long-term health.

44

HR’S CRISIS RESPONSE

The Parkland school shooting earlier this year forced one city’s human resources team to jump into a crisis mode.

CORRECTION

In the May/June “Workforce 100” list, the top ranking HR person at CDW should have been Keith Sanders, and Northwestern Mutual has 5,500 employees.

On The Web

speak up!

The Workforce online community provides you with virtual meeting places to chat about issues and trends affecting you and your workplace.
 

Join the group:
workforce.com/linkedingroup

Columns

4

your force

When Human Resources Reaches Your Neighbors.

14

WORK IN PROGRESS

Is Organizational Turnover Contagious?

19

Benefits beat

A New Look at Caregiving.

22

THE PRACTICAL EMPLOYER

Revisit Your Handbooks.

54

THE LAST WORD

Generation Z,
You’re Just Like Us!

For Your Benefit

16

Pharma Fight to Court

Illinois city files suit versus drugmakers, PBMs to clamp down on soaring costs.

17

ESOPS NO FABLE

With pending legislation, many soon-to-retire boomers are giving ESOPs a fresh look.

17

GASSING UP

Gas-price spike pumps up new perk — fuel delivery at the workplace.

18

PLAYING THEIR CARDS

Noncash rewards are on the rise, but there are legal and practical considerations to keep in mind.

Trending

10

BLOCKCHAIN AND HR

Cryptocurrency tech will change HR. There’s still time to prepare.

11

PEOPLE MOVES AND BY THE NUMBERS

Edelman taps Barker; goodbye boomers, hello Gen Z.

12

Q&A

Jeffrey Pfeffer addresses dying for a paycheck — literally.

12

HUNGRY FOR LUNCH BREAKS

Time away from the desk is a crucial part of a worker’s daily diet.

Legal

20

COLD AS ICE

Employers face stiff fines for immigration documents.

21

LEGAL BRIEFINGS

FMLA emails; boorish boss behavior.

Trending

Blockchain: The Future Of HR?

Cryptocurrency tech will change the way you do your job. Don’t panic, it’s still few years away.

By Sarah Fister Gale

B

lockchain is best known as the infrastructure behind bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies that makes financial transactions safe without a bank or other middleman. But the technology could soon change the way human resources leaders handle all sensitive data.

That has big implications for HR, said Jeff Mike, vice president and HR research leader for Bersin by Deloitte. “The reason it is relevant is that blockchain creates the potential for personal data to be owned by the individual rather than the organization,” he said.

PEOPLE

MARIE-CLAIRE BARKER
Global communications company Edelman named Marie-Claire Barker as global chief talent officer. Barker will lead the firm’s talent development, recruitment and retention efforts, partnering with leaders across the agency network to meet the evolving demands of clients and the diverse needs of employees. She will be based in New York.

GENE RAFFONE
Global asset manager Russell Investments named Gene Raffone as global chief human resources officer. Raffone brings nearly three decades of experience in human capital solutions and has been given a broad mandate in his new role. Raffone will be based in Seattle and serve as a member of the firm’s executive committee.

DIMITRA MANIS
S&P Global named Dimitra Manis executive vice president and chief people officer. She will serve on the company’s operating committee. Manis joins S&P Global from Revlon Inc., where she served as the company’s CHRO. Before that she was SVP for global talent at Estée Lauder Cos. and worked at technology and data analytics-based companies OpenLink and Thomson Reuters. Manis also served in senior leadership roles with AXA Group in Paris and Asia.

moves

SONYA HINDS
Interim HealthCare Inc. named Sonya Hinds as chief administrative officer. Hinds previously was Interim’s senior vice president of human resources, training and IT. Hinds will continue to oversee HR, training and IT as well as recruiting and retention initiatives. Hinds served four years in the U.S. Army and is a veteran of the Gulf War.

REBECCA ROBINS
Interbrand named Rebecca Robins to the newly created role of chief learning and culture officer. Robins’ key focus will be nurturing and developing talent across Interbrand’s 21 offices. Robins has been a catalyst for the consultancy’s focus on learning and development through her leadership of the Interbrand Academy.

JESS WILLIAMS
Biscuitville Fresh Southern named Jess Williams vice president of people excellence. Williams will focus on the company’s talent management, organizational development and functional capability needed to support continued growth. She previously was director of HR for UPM Raflatac’s Americas region and Global Films strategic business unit. She also was director of HR for B/E Aerospace’s seating products group and, before that, worked in HR for General Electric and Honeywell.

To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com. Include People Moves in the subject line.

PEOPLE moves

PEOPLE moves

MARIE-CLAIRE BARKER

Global communications company Edelman named Marie-Claire Barker as global chief talent officer. Barker will lead the firm’s talent development, recruitment and retention efforts, partnering with leaders across the agency network to meet the evolving demands of clients and the diverse needs of employees. She will be based in New York.

GENE RAFFONE

Global asset manager Russell Investments named Gene Raffone as global chief human resources officer. Raffone brings nearly three decades of experience in human capital solutions and has been given a broad mandate in his new role. Raffone will be based in Seattle and serve as a member of the firm’s executive committee.

DIMITRA MANIS

S&P Global named Dimitra Manis executive vice president and chief people officer. She will serve on the company’s operating committee. Manis joins S&P Global from Revlon Inc., where she served as the company’s CHRO. Before that she was SVP for global talent at Estée Lauder Cos. and worked at technology and data analytics-based companies OpenLink and Thomson Reuters. Manis also served in senior leadership roles with AXA Group in Paris and Asia.

SONYA HINDS

Interim HealthCare Inc. named Sonya Hinds as chief administrative officer. Hinds previously was Interim’s senior vice president of human resources, training and IT. Hinds will continue to oversee HR, training and IT as well as recruiting and retention initiatives. Hinds served four years in the U.S. Army and is a veteran of the Gulf War.

REBECCA ROBINS

Interbrand named Rebecca Robins to the newly created role of chief learning and culture officer. Robins’ key focus will be nurturing and developing talent across Interbrand’s 21 offices. Robins has been a catalyst for the consultancy’s focus on learning and development through her leadership of the Interbrand Academy.

JESS WILLIAMS

Biscuitville Fresh Southern named Jess Williams vice president of people excellence. Williams will focus on the company’s talent management, organizational development and functional capability needed to support continued growth. She previously was director of HR for UPM Raflatac’s Americas region and Global Films strategic business unit. She also was director of HR for B/E Aerospace’s seating products group and, before that, worked in HR for General Electric and Honeywell.

To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com. Include People Moves in the subject line.

Trending

Author Addresses Dying For A
Paycheck – Literally

By Aysha Ashley Househ

Jeffrey Pfeffer takes a direct approach when talking about the harmful health effects a negative workplace can have on employees. The professor of organizational behavior at the graduate school of business at Stanford University points out that these effects can happen to someone in any industry.

In his new book, “Dying for a Paycheck,” Pfeffer provides evidence and examples to support his claim that negative workplace environments are hurting — and in some cases killing — employees.

Workforce intern Aysha Ashley Househ spoke to Pfeffer about why he thinks wellness programs don’t work and how the government should regulate management practices.

Trending

Give ’em A Break

By Aysha Ashley Househ

A

new survey shows the vast majority of employees take into account whether they get a lunch break when scouting for a job. Once they land that gig, however, results also show that more employees are scarfing down a sandwich rather than leisurely dining on dim sum.

“Take Back the Lunch Break” shows that 27 percent of the 1,600 North American survey participants don’t take a lunch break each workday. The study notes that going out for lunch helps workers feel more engaged and productive, said Jennifer J. Deal, senior research scientist at the Center for Creative Leadership and affiliated research scientist at the Center for Effective Organizations at the University of Southern California.

Trending

Is Organizational Turnover Contagious?

By Kris Dunn | Work in Progress

P

eople hate it when other people cough or sneeze near them. The reason is simple. We don’t want to catch whatever you have!

We’re quick to say “no” to other people’s physical maladies. We’re much less quick to say no to what researchers have labeled emotional contagion.

What is emotional contagion? It’s the phenomenon of having one person’s emotions and related behaviors directly trigger similar emotions and behaviors in other people. Studies show we pick up cognitive baggage from others without even knowing it — both the positive and negative variety.

For Your Benefit

Public Agencies Taking Pharma Fight to Court

An Illinois city is the latest to file suit against drugmakers and PBMs to clamp down on soaring costs.

By Rita Pyrillis

P

resident Donald Trump put drugmakers and health care “middlemen” on notice during a speech in May pushing for lower prices on prescription drugs. But one employer was ahead of the president, already taking them on in the courts in hopes that more will follow.

The city of Rockford, Illinois, filed a lawsuit April 6 against drug manufacturer Mallinckrodt, which makes H.P. Acthar, a drug that treats a rare and potentially fatal epileptic disorder in infants. Two years ago, Rockford, about 80 miles northwest of Chicago, discovered that the cost to treat just two babies with the drug accounted for 2.5 percent of its $23 million health care fund — nearly a half-million dollars. The drug cost $40 a dose in 2001, but as of 2017, the price soared to more than $34,000 per dose.

For Your Benefit

Gassing Up in the Workplace

Employers are pumping up the perks to drive employee satisfaction.

By Rita Pyrillis

A

s consumers brace for a spike in gas prices this summer, some employees may be feeling a little less pain at the pump thanks to a relatively new perk — fuel delivery at the workplace.

In the past few years, a number of startups that offer this service have popped up across the country, promising to spare employees the hassle of filling up at the gas station. There is Booster Fuels in the Bay Area, Filld in Silicon Valley, Yoshi, which launched last year in Southern California, and Neighborhood Fuel in Miami, among others.

For Your Benefit

No Fable: ESOPs Gain Favor Among Business Owners Looking to Retire

With pending legislation, many soon-to-retire boomers are giving ESOPs a fresh look.

By Patty Kujawa

Having that kind of culture makes it easier for employees to feel empowered to offer ideas for improvement to their company, he said.

“If you are interested in preserving your legacy and rewarding people, ESOPs make sense,” Rosen said. “Selling to someone else makes all of this go away.”

For Your Benefit

Gift Cards Cook Holiday Turkey’s Goose as Employee Incentive

Noncash rewards are on the rise, but there are legal and practical considerations to keep in mind.

By Andie Burjek

C

ash isn’t always king. Employees can feel the love when they receive noncash rewards from their employer.

The 2017 “Trends Study” from the Incentive Research Foundation found that 70 percent of U.S. businesses used gift card programs and 60 percent gave merchandise as some form of reward to their employees. The report also found that U.S. businesses spent $24 billion annually on gift cards.

Noncash rewards such as gift cards help keep employees connected to the greater whole of the organization, according to Jeremy Tolley, chief people officer at CareHere LLC, a Nashville-based health care and wellness provider. Its noncash rewards include sending its nurses a card during National Nurses Week or giving employees an Amazon gift card with a note, “Buy yourself a book! You deserve to curl up, relax and read a book.”

For Your Benefit

A new look at Caregiving

By Jennifer Benz | Benefits Beat

T

his past spring, I got that phone call no one ever wants to receive. My mother had experienced a cardiac incident and had to be resuscitated. Mom, heart stopped, resuscitated was about all I heard or understood before I was on a flight.

When I walked into her hospital room the next day, my mom looked decades older than the last time I had seen her. She was stable but weak. I soon learned that the issue was a pulmonary embolism; a big blood clot had traveled from her leg to her lungs and stopped her heart. Had she not been at the hospital when it happened — literally in the arms of a nurse — she would not have survived.

Legal

Cold as ICE

Employers face stiff fines for immigration documents violations.

By John A. MacKenzie

I

t is no secret that the Trump administration has an agenda to crack down on illegal immigration.

Part of this process includes extensive audits on businesses conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Although immigration management is an important part of our nation’s regulatory and security processes, audits on businesses are often conducted with very little notice and result in hefty fines from ICE.

Legal Briefings

SUPERVISOR SAYS SORRY FOR BOORISH BEHAVIOR
Jacqueline Lee overheard her supervisor, Don Egge, discussing his desire for her to begin wearing her “spring outfits,” describing her and another employee as “here come the jugs” and discussing another employee who was “banging someone.” Lee reported Egge to HR. HR’s investigation confirmed Egge made these comments. Egge apologized to Lee, acknowledged his words were not appropriate and promised it would not happen again. He further promised not to retaliate against Lee. Because there were no other available positions, HR asked Lee to return to work as Egge’s subordinate. Dissatisfied with HR’s response, Lee resigned from her position. That same day, Egge was suspended for two weeks without pay. Lee sued the company for fostering a hostile work environment. The court found the company not liable on two grounds. First, under the law of the Seventh Circuit, a single incident does not create a sexually hostile work environment unless it is tied to physical violence or the direct solicitation of sex. Egge’s conduct, while boorish, was not directed to Lee (she overheard the conversation) and was not severe enough to create a hostile work environment. Second, the company took appropriate remedial action. It conducted a prompt and thorough investigation, elicited an apology from Egge and his commitment not to retaliate or engage in further harassment, and suspended Egge for two weeks without pay. Lee v. Dairyland Power Cooperative, No. 17-cv-50-wmc, 2018 WL 1401274 (W.D. Wis. March 20, 2018).

Legal

Revisit Your Handbooks

By Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer

Revisit Your Handbooks

By Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer

W

hen is the last time you reviewed, or, even better, rewrote your employee handbook?
Last year? Five years ago? Ten years ago? What’s an employee handbook?

Now is as good a time as any to dust off yours, and give it a good review and polishing.

The National Labor Relations Board recently published guidance on the standards it will follow in determining whether a facially neutral employment policy violates the rights of employees to engage in concerted activity protected by section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act.

Someone once said age is not important unless you are cheese or a bottle of wine. As tech companies obsess to remain forever young, older workers may hold the key to the industry’s long-term health.

By Sasha Poljak

I

n 2017, Roger Federer set an all-time record when he won his eighth Wimbledon tennis title at the age of 36. About the same time, Bob Williamson, a lifelong friend of mine, won his 10th salesman of the year award for a large medical systems company at the age of 59.

Neither win was probable, but Federer and my friend were lauded by their competitors and supporters. Their age was once perceived as a hindrance and insurmountable obstacle to reaching the pinnacle in their respective professions. Both my friend and Federer agree that age played a role but didn’t let it define them and subsequently alter their success.

One of my younger friends in his late 20s recently became the chief technology officer of a venture-backed start-up. The position was competitive and he beat out several older and much more experienced individuals to get it. This wasn’t a surprise to me, as I always knew of his superior abilities. His opinion, however, of why he got the job stunned me.

“This was actually easy,” he recalled of the hiring process. “All my competitors were too old.”

While I initially dismissed his reason as utter nonsense, he insisted it was true, that “older workers often don’t work as hard or as long as we do. They prioritize off-work obligations that detract their attention from their primary job. Also, they usually have obsolete skill sets and work styles that make them fall behind.”

Read Full Article

Someone once said age is not important unless you are cheese or a bottle of wine. As tech companies obsess to remain forever young, older workers may hold the key to the industry’s long-term health.

By Sasha Poljak

I

n 2017, Roger Federer set an all-time record when he won his eighth Wimbledon tennis title at the age of 36. About the same time, Bob Williamson, a lifelong friend of mine, won his 10th salesman of the year award for a large medical systems company at the age of 59.

Neither win was probable, but Federer and my friend were lauded by their competitors and supporters. Their age was once perceived as a hindrance and insurmountable obstacle to reaching the pinnacle in their respective professions. Both my friend and Federer agree that age played a role but didn’t let it define them and subsequently alter their success.

One of my younger friends in his late 20s recently became the chief technology officer of a venture-backed start-up. The position was competitive and he beat out several older and much more experienced individuals to get it. This wasn’t a surprise to me, as I always knew of his superior abilities. His opinion, however, of why he got the job stunned me.

“This was actually easy,” he recalled of the hiring process. “All my competitors were too old.”

While I initially dismissed his reason as utter nonsense, he insisted it was true, that “older workers often don’t work as hard or as long as we do. They prioritize off-work obligations that detract their attention from their primary job. Also, they usually have obsolete skill sets and work styles that make them fall behind.”

Read Full Article

Someone once said age is not important unless you are cheese or a bottle of wine. As tech companies obsess to remain forever young, older workers may hold the key to the industry’s long-term health.

By Sasha Poljak

I

n 2017, Roger Federer set an all-time record when he won his eighth Wimbledon tennis title at the age of 36. About the same time, Bob Williamson, a lifelong friend of mine, won his 10th salesman of the year award for a large medical systems company at the age of 59.

Neither win was probable, but Federer and my friend were lauded by their competitors and supporters. Their age was once perceived as a hindrance and insurmountable obstacle to reaching the pinnacle in their respective professions. Both my friend and Federer agree that age played a role but didn’t let it define them and subsequently alter their success.

One of my younger friends in his late 20s recently became the chief technology officer of a venture-backed start-up. The position was competitive and he beat out several older and much more experienced individuals to get it. This wasn’t a surprise to me, as I always knew of his superior abilities. His opinion, however, of why he got the job stunned me.

“This was actually easy,” he recalled of the hiring process. “All my competitors were too old.”

While I initially dismissed his reason as utter nonsense, he insisted it was true, that “older workers often don’t work as hard or as long as we do. They prioritize off-work obligations that detract their attention from their primary job. Also, they usually have obsolete skill sets and work styles that make them fall behind.”

Read Full Article

Plugged-in
Professionals

T

he 2018 class of Workforce Game Changers knocked our socks off with their accomplishments in all areas of human resources, including recruiting, culture, training and benefits. What really stood out this year, though, was the large number of applicants who have advanced HR technology and analytics in their organizations.

Now in its eighth year, the Workforce Game Changers awards recognize high-potential young professionals under the age of 40 who are making their mark on the HR profession. This class is certainly representative of that, especially as talk in the HR community has shifted to data and analytics. One key skill in this area is knowing what to do with it and not getting bogged down by the vast quantity of content. Many of the Game Changers this year have had the intelligence and ability to know exactly what to do to improve their organization.

We’ve also asked several of our tech-centric honorees to record themselves talking about the latest trends in HR technology and the projects they’re working on in that space. The video will be available at Workforce.com/HRTechGameChangers.

One of these HR pros is also our youngest Game Changer yet. At age 20, Zackary King of Public Health-Seattle & King County, pictured at right, has significantly improved the agency’s recruiting efforts by developing a new digital platform.

Other winners have proven, still, that you don’t need to have the tech expertise as long as you understand the human aspect of human resources. Eric Watkins — who at 27 is also one of our youngest Game Changers — began as an unpaid intern at his company but through his determination rose through the ranks and made an impressive impact on revenue growth.

Shirley Cruz-Rodriguez from Fannie Mae proved that a person can put their heart into making the world a better place while at the same time making her company a quality organization. She participated in hurricane relief efforts and also developed an award-winning mentoring program.

This is an impressive group of young HR talent, and we’re proud to call them our 2018 Game Changers. Congratulations to all of them!
— Andie Burjek

Plugged-in
Professionals

T

he 2018 class of Workforce Game Changers knocked our socks off with their accomplishments in all areas of human resources, including recruiting, culture, training and benefits. What really stood out this year, though, was the large number of applicants who have advanced HR technology and analytics in their organizations.

Now in its eighth year, the Workforce Game Changers awards recognize high-potential young professionals under the age of 40 who are making their mark on the HR profession. This class is certainly representative of that, especially as talk in the HR community has shifted to data and analytics. One key skill in this area is knowing what to do with it and not getting bogged down by the vast quantity of content. Many of the Game Changers this year have had the intelligence and ability to know exactly what to do to improve their organization.

We’ve also asked several of our tech-centric honorees to record themselves talking about the latest trends in HR technology and the projects they’re working on in that space. The video will be available at Workforce.com/HRTechGameChangers.

One of these HR pros is also our youngest Game Changer yet. At age 20, Zackary King of Public Health-Seattle & King County, pictured at right, has significantly improved the agency’s recruiting efforts by developing a new digital platform.

Other winners have proven, still, that you don’t need to have the tech expertise as long as you understand the human aspect of human resources. Eric Watkins — who at 27 is also one of our youngest Game Changers — began as an unpaid intern at his company but through his determination rose through the ranks and made an impressive impact on revenue growth.

Shirley Cruz-Rodriguez from Fannie Mae proved that a person can put their heart into making the world a better place while at the same time making her company a quality organization. She participated in hurricane relief efforts and also developed an award-winning mentoring program.

This is an impressive group of young HR talent, and we’re proud to call them our 2018 Game Changers. Congratulations to all of them!
— Andie Burjek

On Charismatic Leadership

By Ryne A. Sherman

Everyone agrees that effective leaders are trustworthy, competent, and make good decisions in a timely fashion. When it comes to charisma, however, opinions vary widely. Some say charisma is an essential quality of effective leadership. Others say charisma’s antonym—humility—is an essential quality of effective leadership. So, which is it? On the one hand, we want leaders who inspire us and put forward a vision for the future. On the other hand, we want leaders who listen to others and share credit with the team. Are charismatic leaders effective or not?

At long last, some research finally offers a scientifically-based answer to this question. And the conclusion may come as a surprise: when it comes to charisma and humility, effective leaders have both. In this article, I highlight the key findings of the study, relate it to current thinking about charisma, and point out practical implications for coaching and leadership development.

Crisis HR

The Marjory Stoneman Douglas school shooting sent one city’s HR team into a crisis response mode.

BY CAROL BRZOZOWSKI

This past Valentine’s Day, Coral Springs, Florida’s human resources director Dale Pazdra kicked off an internal monthlong kindness challenge campaign in the new city hall. Employees gathered that morning to enjoy breakfast treats and share in friendly conversation. Pazdra had no idea how critical those values would become in a matter of hours.

Background Checking Providers

Too Many Rules

How a patchwork of screening regulations is putting companies at risk — and how screening vendors are trying to help.

By Sarah Fister Gale

B

ackground screening is often considered the most tedious and stressful aspect of the recruiting process. While it will never be a pleasant experience, companies and vendors are focused on making it as painless as possible. “If recruiting gets bogged down during background screening you run the risk of losing candidates — and all the resources you spent recruiting them in the first place,” said Dawn Standerwick, vice president of strategic growth for Employment Screening Resources, a background screening company in Boulder, Colorado. You also the run the risk that they will complain about the process to friends and colleagues, said Richard Seldon, president of Sterling Talent Solutions, a global background screening company in New York. “Companies want candidates to say the process was efficient, timely and easy to do.”

Training Providers

Your Training Program Is Not Enough

Why corporate training hasn’t kept up with today’s learners and what needs to change.

By Sarah Fister Gale

T

he way employees learn has changed dramatically in the past decade. Today’s learners want just-in-time, relevant, chunky content that is available any time from any device. And for the most part, learning leaders have fallen in line, providing vast libraries of content that can be consumed quickly and easily by anyone on an as-needed basis.

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Last Word

Rick Bell

Everything Old Is New Again For Gen Z

Everything Old Is New Again For Gen Z

I

never made a commencement speech. Class salutatorian or valedictorian? More like class clown.

My kids would probably tell you that the wisest piece of advice I offered them at our post-graduation party was, “Order the chicken; the burgers are really greasy.”

But that won’t stop me from providing you, the graduating Class of 2018, a bit of advice. I know, you’ve already heard the insights and anecdotes of irrelevant politicians, has-been actors and ol’ State U’s biggest donor. Serial, what can the Black Eyed Peas’ will.i.am possibly impart on any graduating class?

Thanks for reading our July/August 2018 issue!