January/February 2019

January/February 2019

| From Our Editors

I’m old enough to remember when you had to roll down your car window by hand. Lap belts in the front seat, too.

Now, power windows come standard. Anti-lock brakes and air bags, as well. Back-up cameras, GPS and satellite radio are increasingly part of the package.

What was once a luxury is now standard issue.

In HR, a similar rise in standards continues apace. Each year, organizations expect more and better practices from their HR departments. Organizations are better for it, too.

So when the ISO announced last month the release of standards for recruitment, diversity, workforce planning, leadership and workplace culture among others (page 40), it’s worth remembering the professionalization of the field wasn’t always a given.

Now it comes standard. Time to up the game again.

—Mike Prokopeak,
Editor in Chief

The workplace has changed a lot since 1922. That year The Journal of Personnel Research debuted, rebranded later as Personnel Journal and finally Workforce. Now in our 97th year, we take a look back at what was on the minds of past generations of people managers.

Acting on Labor Relations, September 1935

Arguably the most historic federal labor-relations decision to protect both workers and employers was signed into law in 1935, and the September issue of Personnel Journal took eight pages to republish major provisions of the Wagner-Connery Labor Disputes Act along with brief commentary on their significance. The commentary lends little perspective — “It does not cover all industry and labor, but is applicable only when violation of the legal right of independent self-organization would burden or obstruct interstate commerce” — but the significance of devoting that much space in a magazine reveals the wide-ranging impact of this landmark labor legislation. The issue also contained a book review of “Government Career Service,” in which author Leonard D. White wrote, “Unless we establish a recognized career comparable to the careers which can be found in the universities, in the professions, and in the business world, the best men will go elsewhere and government will get exactly what it deserves.” Finally, a short story on “Beauty Culture as a Vocation for Women” pointed out disparities in pay — between “white women” earning $14.25 a week and “Negro women” who earned $8. And white men? They averaged $22.50 a week.— Rick Bell

Aren’t the ’90s Ironic? January 1999

We’re ringing in the new year with an issue that summarized a decade with an abundance of pop culture references. Allan Halcrow, editor in chief at the time, channeled his inner Forrest Gump in his editorial letter, writing that work in the ’90s was “a lot more than a box of chocolates.”

“The ’90s in Review” looked at everything from the Middle East crisis to presidential impeachment hearings to the death of Princess Diana. The story deemed the decade as “a decade of irony,” referencing Alanis Morissette’s hit song “Ironic.”

What was ironic about the workplace of the ’90s, exactly? Even though corporate America embraced diversity initiatives throughout the decade, employee lawsuits against employers for inequities were higher in the late ’90s than at the outset.

The issue also featured a news brief about women’s groups pressing lawmakers to get employers to cover the cost of contraception as a health benefit, since following the release of Viagra in 1998, most insurers covered the prescription for men — something more inconsistent than ironic.

Finally, there was a list of new workplace trends that began appearing in the ’90s — many of which are still relevant today. November 1998 marked the beginning of telecommuting becoming an acceptable practice. February 1996 marked a period of gang infiltration in the workplace. And April 1997 brought on new HR challenges thanks to a series of mega-mergers.

Andie Burjek

The effectiveness of diversity programs is a controversial subject in 2018, but it was even questioned 20 years ago, when Workforce Editor-at-Large Gillian Flynn, now more well-known for writing the popular novel “Gone Girl,” wrote “The Harsh Reality of Diversity Programs.” “Women and minorities are sick of the status quo,” Flynn wrote, and they’re cynical about diversity programs.

Their complaints about diversity programs are abundant. Many promote stereotypes, the article stated. “All it does is translate a negative stereotype (women are emotional) to a positive one (women are intuitive). [This] does little to foster individual respect.”

Women and minorities dislike being treated like a homogenous group. “They feel this approach is condescending,” Flynn wrote. Women aren’t always more collaborative, creative or emotional than men, and men aren’t always more logical, linear or competitive than women.

Elsewhere, columnist Shari Caudron made a strong statement that HR people should tell the truth all the time, no matter what, instead of “wimping out” under pressure. “If you’re mad at your boss, tell her. If the budget is unrealistic, say so. If employees want to know how restructuring will affect their jobs, tell them,” she wrote.

Also in this issue, a wellness brief suggested that to prevent repetitive stress injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome, one option is Jazzercise. And a financial column focused on how “the era of affordable health care costs may be coming to an end.” Twenty years later, it’d be hard to find an employer who disagrees with that.

Andie Burjek

The effectiveness of diversity programs is a controversial subject in 2018, but it was even questioned 20 years ago, when Workforce Editor-at-Large Gillian Flynn, now more well-known for writing the popular novel “Gone Girl,” wrote “The Harsh Reality of Diversity Programs.” “Women and minorities are sick of the status quo,” Flynn wrote, and they’re cynical about diversity programs.

Their complaints about diversity programs are abundant. Many promote stereotypes, the article stated. “All it does is translate a negative stereotype (women are emotional) to a positive one (women are intuitive). [This] does little to foster individual respect.”

Women and minorities dislike being treated like a homogenous group. “They feel this approach is condescending,” Flynn wrote. Women aren’t always more collaborative, creative or emotional than men, and men aren’t always more logical, linear or competitive than women.

Elsewhere, columnist Shari Caudron made a strong statement that HR people should tell the truth all the time, no matter what, instead of “wimping out” under pressure. “If you’re mad at your boss, tell her. If the budget is unrealistic, say so. If employees want to know how restructuring will affect their jobs, tell them,” she wrote.

Also in this issue, a wellness brief suggested that to prevent repetitive stress injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome, one option is Jazzercise. And a financial column focused on how “the era of affordable health care costs may be coming to an end.” Twenty years later, it’d be hard to find an employer who disagrees with that.

Andie Burjek

On The Cover

WORKIN’ IN MEMPHIS

Alex Smith took her private sector savviness public and acquired crucial HR tech tools.

Cover Photo by MICHAEL ALLEN

On The Cover

WORKIN’ IN MEMPHIS

Alex Smith took her private sector savviness public and acquired crucial HR tech tools.

Cover Photo by Michael Allen

Sector Report

44

RECRUITMENT PROCESS OUTSOURCING PROVIDERS

Recruitment process outsourcing companies do more than you think.

46

RECRUITING SOFTWARE PROVIDERS

Recruiting technology has suddenly become a hot commodity.

Features

26

Civic Lessons

An aging workforce and outdated hiring processes put public sector employers on notice.

32

Going into Labor Relations

HR Director Dale Pazdra and labor relations specialist Jerry Glass sound off on smoothing negotiations.

40

HR CERTIFIED

Recent approval by the ISO brings standardization practices to the human resources profession.

On The Web

speak up!

The Workforce online community provides you with virtual meeting places to chat about issues and trends affecting you and your workplace.
 

Join the group:
workforce.com/linkedingroup

Columns

4

your force

Setting the New Standard for Human Resources

14

WORK IN PROGRESS

That New Boss Feeling

19

Benefits beat

It’s Time to Get Political

22

THE PRACTICAL EMPLOYER

America’s Worst Employers

50

THE LAST WORD

Public Sector Modernization Plan

For Your Benefit

16

QUALITY OF LIFE CARE

Palliative care is growing as a sought-after benefits option.

17

TAKING NOTICE

More employers make mental health issues a top priority.

17

FINANCIAL BENEFIT

Student loan payoff pays off for 401(k) contributions.

18

DESIGNING PROGRAMS

Wellness plans no longer have EEOC incentive guidelines to follow.

Trending

10

BACK TO SCHOOL

Feds hit campuses to find and attract younger workers.

11

PEOPLE MOVES AND BY THE NUMBERS

TD Bank, SAP, Whirlpool greet new HR heads; going public.

12

Q&A

Feeding America’s Matt Hayes.

12

PUBLIC EXCHANGE

The IPMA honors several public sector HR leaders.

Legal

20

MANAGING A MERGER

Labor issues become a top concern during an acquisition.

21

LEGAL BRIEFINGS

Age bias; suing employees.

Trending

Talent Crisis Sends Feds to School to Attract Younger Workers

Solutions to easing the talent gap are more complicated than expedited hiring.

By Carol Brzozowski

A

n increasing U.S. population is requiring greater reliance on federal government services as the public sector workforce faces a growing talent crisis.

Thomas Ross, president of the Volcker Alliance, said 7.2 percent of the federal government workforce is younger than 30 years old compared to 25 percent in the private sector where young people interested in areas such as cybersecurity can command higher pay.

Meanwhile, the federal workforce is aging, with retirements creating vacancies.

When President Donald Trump signed HR 5515 — the John McCain National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal 2019 — into law in August, it initiated civil-service reform legislation not seen in nearly four decades.

PEOPLE
Kelley Cornish
TD Bank named Kelley Cornish head of global diversity and inclusion. Cornish will expand the bank’s efforts to promote diversity throughout the U.S. and Canada, implementing and delivering its enterprise D&I strategy, with a focus on building and measuring workforce representation and extending accountability for inclusion across the organization. Cornish joined TD in 2017
Susan Eisma
Merlin Entertainments named Susan Eisma as human resources director for Legoland New York Resort. Eisma, a native of the village of Florida, New York, will lead the HR strategy for Legoland New York Resort as it prepares to recruit, hire and train 1,300 employees — many of them from the surrounding area. Eisma was previously VP of HR at Patina Restaurant Group.
Mike Ferguson
BPO provider TaskUs named Mike Ferguson its first chief people officer. Ferguson will play a crucial role in building the company’s reputation as a “people first” employer as the company continues to expand globally. Ferguson brings two decades of experience in HR strategies and programs for international organizations. He comes to TaskUs from Chipotle Mexican Grill, where he was head of people support.
moves
Carey Martin
Whirlpool Corp. named Carey Martin as vice president of global human resources. Martin will succeed David Binkley as chief human resources officer in 2019. Martin joined Whirlpool in 2013 as vice president of human resources for the North America region. Martin will report directly to Whirlpool CEO Marc Bitzer.
Amy Smith
Real estate investment company The Laramar Group named Amy Smith as vice president of human resources. Smith will develop and implement Laramar Group’s HR strategy for its 600 employees over multiple states and oversee all talent acquisition for multiple markets.
Judith Michelle Williams
SAP SE named Judith Michelle Williams head of people sustainability and chief diversity and inclusion officer. Williams will grow SAP’s D&I strategy to fuel innovation and engagement and to drive business success and lead business health and diversity and inclusion, which focuses on gender intelligence, cross-generational intelligence, culture and identity, and differently abled people.
To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com.
Include People Moves in the subject line.
PEOPLE moves
PEOPLE moves
Kelley Cornish
TD Bank named Kelley Cornish head of global diversity and inclusion. Cornish will expand the bank’s efforts to promote diversity throughout the U.S. and Canada, implementing and delivering its enterprise D&I strategy, with a focus on building and measuring workforce representation and extending accountability for inclusion across the organization. Cornish joined TD in 2017
Susan Eisma
Merlin Entertainments named Susan Eisma as human resources director for Legoland New York Resort. Eisma, a native of the village of Florida, New York, will lead the HR strategy for Legoland New York Resort as it prepares to recruit, hire and train 1,300 employees — many of them from the surrounding area. Eisma was previously VP of HR at Patina Restaurant Group.
Mike Ferguson
BPO provider TaskUs named Mike Ferguson its first chief people officer. Ferguson will play a crucial role in building the company’s reputation as a “people first” employer as the company continues to expand globally. Ferguson brings two decades of experience in HR strategies and programs for international organizations. He comes to TaskUs from Chipotle Mexican Grill, where he was head of people support.
Carey Martin
Whirlpool Corp. named Carey Martin as vice president of global human resources. Martin will succeed David Binkley as chief human resources officer in 2019. Martin joined Whirlpool in 2013 as vice president of human resources for the North America region. Martin will report directly to Whirlpool CEO Marc Bitzer.
Amy Smith
Real estate investment company The Laramar Group named Amy Smith as vice president of human resources. Smith will develop and implement Laramar Group’s HR strategy for its 600 employees over multiple states and oversee all talent acquisition for multiple markets.
Judith Michelle Williams
SAP SE named Judith Michelle Williams head of people sustainability and chief diversity and inclusion officer. Williams will grow SAP’s D&I strategy to fuel innovation and engagement and to drive business success and lead business health and diversity and inclusion, which focuses on gender intelligence, cross-generational intelligence, culture and identity, and differently abled people.
To be considered for People Moves, email a brief announcement and a high-resolution color photo to editors@workforce.com.
Include People Moves in the subject line.

Trending

An Employee Engagement Guru

By David Chasanov

Matt Hayes has been working in human resources for a quarter century. Some 18 of those 25 years were spent with Ingredion Inc., a for-profit ingredient provider. Two years ago, he made the shift to the nonprofit organization Feeding America. From providing volunteer opportunities to conducting employee surveys, Hayes, Feeding America’s CHRO, has excelled in all aspects of employee engagement.

Workforce: What got you interested in being a leader at this organization?

Matt Hayes: For quite a while in my career I thought about working for a mission-based organization. When Feeding America came along, I learned more about hunger in America and the impact it has in every community. Seeing the work Feeding America does to respond to that challenge, I wanted to join the fight. I’ve gotten to know the organization better and these people are very passionately committed to what we are doing. It’s a fun environment to work in as a regular employee and HR leader.

Trending

Public Honors

By David Chasanov

T

hree agencies, two HR veterans and a local association chapter recently were recognized by the International Public Management Association for Human Resources for public sector contributions.

The IPMA’s Agency Awards for Excellence went to Suffolk, Virginia, Department of Human Resources & Risk Management in the Up to 1,999 Employees category; the City and County of Denver Office of Human Resource in the 2,000 to 9,999 Employees category; and the state of Tennessee Department of Human Resources in the More Than 10,000 Employees category.

Agency awards go to member human resources programs whose overall quality, accomplishments and contributions have exceeded those normally seen in the public sector for at least the past three years, according to the IPMA.

Trending

3 Behaviors for Leadership in the Digital Age

By China Gorman

I

t’s not enough for business leaders to merely be behind the curtain anymore.

In a world that’s rapidly becoming more technology driven, managers and executives must put in extra effort to create human relationships with their people — connections that are necessary for any organization to thrive in a complex and competitive marketplace.

The more your business is centered around artificial intelligence or other digital technologies, the more effort you have to make to be human and to create human relationships, pry people away from their smartphones, have face-to-face conversations, appreciate people and be honest.

Trending

The Workforce Guide to Performance Measurement

By Mike Prokopeak

M

anagement moguls are mad for measurement. Measurement is the key to higher corporate performance, some argue. It’s the path to optimal results, other say. With just the right measurement approach, a middle-of-the-road employee can be transformed into a world-class performer.

Performance measurement might just be one of the most important and most misunderstood concepts in management today. Add in modern technology and its ability to hoover up vast amounts of data and spit it back out into an endless series of charts, widgets and dashboards and the head spins.

When it comes to HR, measurement is both art and science. A century ago, it wasn’t just a fleet of Model T cars that came rolling off an assembly line in Detroit. Along with them came the popularization of an emerging business model: scientific management. Pioneered by efficiency guru Frederick W. Taylor, scientific management took engineering principles and applied them to the factory floor, helping bosses squeeze the most of their workers and machines.

Trending

That New Boss Feeling

By Kris Dunn | Work in Progress

“W

here are we at with <insert random request for information>?”

If you hear this type of question from a new boss as an HR leader, be alert. This question is not an invitation to list what’s been done. It’s a test.

Put on a helmet, kids, because I’m about to give you some tough love.

In the future, all of you reading this will get a new boss. Most of you will have five to 10 new bosses across the rest of your career, which is reflective of how chaotic work is for our generation and the general pace of change.

For Your Benefit

Employers See Palliative Care as Option to Cut Health Costs
A new guide is available to educate employers on palliative care strategies.

By Rita Pyrillis

W

hen George Schwartz’s late wife was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer in 2002, he faced the task of managing her care while working as a financial advisor in a small brokerage firm.

He accompanied her to appointments, researched treatment options, coordinated her care and struggled to manage the fears that came with the dire diagnosis.

The experience was both physically and emotionally draining. It wasn’t until the couple turned to palliative medicine, a fairly new subspecialty recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties in 2007 that helps patients manage serious illnesses, that the load became bearable, he recalled.

For Your Benefit

Minding Mental Health
Studies: Depression costs on the rise.

By Rita Pyrillis

M

ental illness has been a long-avoided topic in the workplace. But as rates of suicide, substance abuse, anxiety and depression increase, more employers are making these issues a top priority.

In fact, 57 percent of employers plan to increase their focus on mental and behavioral health to a great or “very great extent” over the next three years, according to a recent survey by Willis Towers Watson. Those surveyed rank mental illness alongside metabolic syndrome, diabetes and musculoskeletal disorders as top areas of concern. These are chronic conditions that require ongoing treatment, which drive up costs and contribute to lost productivity.

These factors have led more employers to examine the financial impact of mental illness on the workplace, said Darcy Gruttadaro, director, Center for Workplace Mental Health at the American Psychiatric Association Foundation.

For Your Benefit

Student Loan Payoff Pays 401(k)s
Despite overall positivity, experts warn of hidden pitfalls.

By Patty Kujawa

I

n an effort to help workers achieve certain financial wellness goals, the Internal Revenue Service recently issued a ruling allowing one company to make contributions to 401(k) accounts on behalf of those who pay off a certain percentage of student debt.

The IRS private letter ruling, issued last summer, was a response to an unnamed company’s request to amend its plan so workers who voluntarily agree to put at least 2 percent of pay toward a student loan would be eligible to receive an employer contribution equal to 5 percent of pay to their 401(k) plan.

The company — reportedly pharmaceutical giant Abbott Laboratories — asked for the IRS ruling last year because it was concerned it was violating a rule that bans employers from setting certain conditions before employees can become eligible for other benefits. Because the employer 401(k) contribution is triggered by the employee first opting to make the student loan payment, the IRS said the company was not violating the rule.

For Your Benefit

New Year, New Rules for Employee Wellness

Employers designing wellness programs no longer have EEOC incentive guidelines to follow.

By Andie Burjek

N

ew year, new rules. At least for companies with workplace wellness programs.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s incentive rule — which dictated that wellness programs are considered voluntary if the incentive or penalty was no more than 30 percent of the cost of the health insurance — will no longer be in effect as of Jan. 1, 2019, following a lawsuit filed by AARP. This has some employers feeling lost on the legality and future of their wellness programs.

AARP claimed that the 30 percent incentive was coercive, leaving employees no choice but to participate in a program that is supposedly “voluntary,” and this was problematic when participating in a program meant sharing private health information. With no rule to follow, employers can offer whatever incentive they want, which also increases the program’s risk of legal action from employees.

For Your Benefit

It’s Time to Get Political

By Jennifer Benz | Benefits Beat

I

n November, I spent a long weekend before the midterm election supporting my brother-in-law’s campaign for a state Assembly seat in rural Wisconsin.

We traveled to several campaign offices and spent the days knocking on doors in small towns. Approaching strangers’ houses to ask them about their political affiliations or their plans to vote can be an uncomfortable experience at first. But it quickly becomes energizing as you encounter incredibly interesting people and witness their reactions.

For me, being part of the boots-on-the-ground effort to motivate voters was deeply inspiring, and it renewed my appreciation for the tireless work that happens outside the cable news cycle.

Legal

Labor Issues a Costly Concern During Acquisitions
Make sure frontline workers are cared for or anticipate big problems.
By Heather M. Sager
W

hen a company is considering a merger or weighing the idea of an acquisition, it is crucial to assess the impact on operations and, specifically, on labor and employment issues. Deal attorneys and bankers focus on the underlying value analysis and purchase documents, which clearly are important.

However, liability for labor and employment issues can be created by acts or omissions and rarely is avoided solely by virtue of indemnification clauses or seller warranties in deal documents.

Put simply, our legal system operates in large part to protect the “little guy,” which in the employment context, means the employee, not the company. This means that, despite the iron-clad separation of entities from a financial perspective, if operations continue following deal closure, an acquiring entity may be held liable for workplace obligations agreed to by the seller-predecessor or for acts or omissions creating liability prior to the close of the purchase.

Legal Briefings

PUBLIC SECTOR EMPLOYERS AND AGE DISCRIMINATION
When Mount Lemmon (Arizona) Fire District faced a budget crisis, it laid off its two oldest (and highest paid) full-time firefighters. They sued under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act. The district argued that it did not violate any laws because it is too small to be considered an “employer” under the ADEA. Section 630(b) of the ADEA defines the term “employer” to mean any individual or company who has 20 or more employees. It states the term employer “also means a State or political subdivision of a State.” The district argued that the two sentences should be read together to excuse any state or local government employer with fewer than 20 employees from complying with the ADEA. The district urged the court to adopt this interpretation because it is consistent with court decisions applying the minimum employee requirement to public employers under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The court disagreed with each of the district’s arguments. It held that by using the terms “also means,” Congress intended to add a second definition of the term “employer,” not clarify the prior definition. The court also noted that the ADEA is sometimes broader than Title VII due to the different language used in each statute. Mount Lemmon Fire Dist. v. John Guido, No. 17-587 (Nov. 6, 2018).

Legal

America’s Worst Employers

Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer

America’s Worst Employers

By Jon Hyman | The Practical Employer

T

hroughout 2018 I tracked the worst behavior America’s employers offered up to their workforces. I found each of the examples I tracked in actual court filings or in news stories. These are actual employers doing actual awful things to their employees.

How truly awful does one need to be to be named the 2018 Worst Employer of the Year? Consider that the following bad bosses did not make the cut in our online poll:

The Pregnancy Provoker: A supervisor compared an employee’s pregnancy to a tumor, expressed hope that she’d miscarry so that she wouldn’t miss work and told her to keep her legs crossed to delay childbirth so she could keep working.

Global Employee Benefits Trends: The Tipping Point
Thomsons Online Benefits conducts an annual survey of multi-national employers to ascertain trends in global benefits, the ‘Global Employee Benefits Watch’. The following is a summary of this year’s findings.

Benefits professionals are under pressure. The costs of providing benefits is rising, fuelled predominantly by the increase in health insurance and retirement costs associated largely with an ageing workforce. This can be seen most starkly in the United States, where, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics , benefits accounted for 32% of total employer compensation costs.

So, it is not surprising that benefits are under renewed scrutiny by the C-suite.

This intense inspection reveals that a one-size-fits-all approach to benefits will not do. Today’s employees resist categorization, demanding exceptional and individualized employee experiences, underpinned by trust and transparency.

Civic Lessons
An aging workforce and outdated processes put public sector employers on notice.

By Carol Brzozowski

A

t a time when careers in government are increasingly underscored with public and political pressure, Kirsten Wyatt is sounding the alarm about the public sector workforce.

“The government needs to wake up and realize there’s a talent war,” said Wyatt, executive director of the Oregon-based Engaging Local Government Leaders, a nonprofit promoting diversity, education and networking among local government employees on a national level. “If you’re going to be competing for entry-level or jobs you want to fill with talent you can then nurture, you need to put in more effort.”

Public sector agencies from the massive federal government to tiny rural townships face unique challenges when competing with private businesses for talent. Recruiting and retention is a recurring concern for the skill set often associated with public service employees. And it’s no secret that private sector companies typically offer substantially higher wages and more flexible work schedules. And there are other factors coming into play.

Prime among them is the so-called silver tsunami, a wave of baby boomers exiting the workforce into retirement. Studies show some 10,000 boomers retire every day, leaving a huge gap for public sector employers to fill.

Civic Lessons
An aging workforce and outdated processes put public sector employers on notice.

By Carol Brzozowski

A

t a time when careers in government are increasingly underscored with public and political pressure, Kirsten Wyatt is sounding the alarm about the public sector workforce.

“The government needs to wake up and realize there’s a talent war,” said Wyatt, executive director of the Oregon-based Engaging Local Government Leaders, a nonprofit promoting diversity, education and networking among local government employees on a national level. “If you’re going to be competing for entry-level or jobs you want to fill with talent you can then nurture, you need to put in more effort.”

Public sector agencies from the massive federal government to tiny rural townships face unique challenges when competing with private businesses for talent. Recruiting and retention is a recurring concern for the skill set often associated with public service employees. And it’s no secret that private sector companies typically offer substantially higher wages and more flexible work schedules. And there are other factors coming into play.

Prime among them is the so-called silver tsunami, a wave of baby boomers exiting the workforce into retirement. Studies show some 10,000 boomers retire every day, leaving a huge gap for public sector employers to fill.

Going Into Labor Relations
By keeping employee engagement in mind, union officials and public sector HR leaders can more easily find common ground.

By DALE PAZDRA

A

nimosity and being at odds no longer have to be the norm when coming to the table to negotiate public sector union-labor agreements.

By creating an environment that supports greater collaboration and problem-solving, the needs of both labor and management can be better understood. A climate of trust will grow when collaboration includes opportunities to increase employee engagement. Based on the input of three labor-relations experts, there are multiple ways to increase employee engagement and improve the effectiveness of labor relations.

Going Into
Labor Relations
By keeping employee engagement in mind, union officials and public sector HR leaders can more easily find common ground.

By DALE PAZDRA

A

nimosity and being at odds no longer have to be the norm when coming to the table to negotiate public sector union-labor agreements.

By creating an environment that supports greater collaboration and problem-solving, the needs of both labor and management can be better understood. A climate of trust will grow when collaboration includes opportunities to increase employee engagement. Based on the input of three labor-relations experts, there are multiple ways to increase employee engagement and improve the effectiveness of labor relations.

Going Into Labor Relations

D

espite the Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting that 10.7 percent of all wage and salary workers in the U.S. are union members in both the private and public sector, union membership of public sector employees at the federal, state and local levels is well above that at 34.4 percent.

Just in local government, the rate of union membership is 40.1 percent and includes teachers, police officers and firefighters. In contrast, only 6.5 percent of private sector employees belong to unions. That number is significant because average private sector compensation costs average $34.19 per hour, compared to an average of $49.23 per hour in state and local government — a 30 percent difference in private to public employment costs.

Come to the bargaining table with the shared goal of finding a solution. It might even help to use private sector tactics.

By Jerry Glass

Come to the bargaining table with the shared goal of finding a solution. It might even help to use private sector tactics.

By Jerry Glass

D

espite the Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting that 10.7 percent of all wage and salary workers in the U.S. are union members in both the private and public sector, union membership of public sector employees at the federal, state and local levels is well above that at 34.4 percent.

Just in local government, the rate of union membership is 40.1 percent and includes teachers, police officers and firefighters. In contrast, only 6.5 percent of private sector employees belong to unions. That number is significant because average private sector compensation costs average $34.19 per hour, compared to an average of $49.23 per hour in state and local government — a 30 percent difference in private to public employment costs.

Going Into
Labor Relations
Come to the bargaining table with the shared goal of finding a solution. It might even help to use private sector tactics.

By Jerry Glass

D

espite the Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting that 10.7 percent of all wage and salary workers in the U.S. are union members in both the private and public sector, union membership of public sector employees at the federal, state and local levels is well above that at 34.4 percent.

Just in local government, the rate of union membership is 40.1 percent and includes teachers, police officers and firefighters. In contrast, only 6.5 percent of private sector employees belong to unions. That number is significant because average private sector compensation costs average $34.19 per hour, compared to an average of $49.23 per hour in state and local government — a 30 percent difference in private to public employment costs.

Some public sector agencies are still mired in paperwork and are slow to embrace cloud-based HR technology. What will push them?

By Sarah Fister Gale

W

hen Alex Smith was hired as the chief human resources officer for the city of Memphis in 2016, she had never previously held a public sector job — one of the reasons she was selected.

City leaders wanted to bring fresh eyes to the team to address the ongoing problem of how to attract and retain the best talent to city jobs. Smith found that many of the city’s human resources processes were still paper-based and data was stored in siloed databases, which added time and confusion to hiring and talent management.

Surrounding Memphis CHRO Alex Smith, from left, is:
Belinda Vinson: Data management supervisor
Eric Sabatini: Sr. HR analytics & performance manager
Kimberly Bailey: HR solution supervisor
Alicia E. Jones: Performance review coordinator
Kianah Wicks-Moore: HR solutions analyst
Chastity Johnson: Lead compensation coordinator
Surrounding Memphis CHRO Alex Smith, from left, is:
Belinda Vinson: Data management supervisor
Eric Sabatini: Sr. HR analytics & performance manager
Kimberly Bailey: HR solution supervisor
Alicia E. Jones: Performance review coordinator
Kianah Wicks-Moore: HR solutions analyst
Chastity Johnson: Lead compensation coordinator
Some public sector agencies are still mired in paperwork and are slow to embrace cloud-based HR technology. What will push them?

By Sarah Fister Gale

W

hen Alex Smith was hired as the chief human resources officer for the city of Memphis in 2016, she had never previously held a public sector job — one of the reasons she was selected.

City leaders wanted to bring fresh eyes to the team to address the ongoing problem of how to attract and retain the best talent to city jobs. Smith found that many of the city’s human resources processes were still paper-based and data was stored in siloed databases, which added time and confusion to hiring and talent management.

HR Certified
Voluntary standardized human capital reporting has been on the table for several years. With the recent ISO approval, it’s about to become reality.

BY LAURIE BASSI AND DAN McMURRER

I

n November the first-ever ISO standard for human capital reporting was passed. Officially titled the “Human Resource Management — Guidelines for Internal and External Human Capital Reporting,” it was scheduled for publication Dec. 18.

Some background: ISO is the International Organization for Standardization. It is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies — the ISO member bodies.

The member body for the United States in the ISO is ANSI — the American National Standards Institute. The work of preparing international standards is normally carried out through ISO Technical Committees. In this case, the work was done by Technical Committee 260.

In 2011-12, there was an ANSI effort to create a human capital reporting standard for the United States. Those of us involved in the early ANSI work were disappointed when it failed to progress; we had hoped that an ANSI standard would eventually lead to an ISO standard. Although the ANSI effort was ultimately tabled, a subsequent ISO group formed to tackle the issue, resulting in the standard that was finalized Nov. 22.

HR Certified
Voluntary standardized human capital reporting has been on the table for several years. With the recent ISO approval, it’s about to become reality.

BY LAURIE BASSI AND DAN McMURRER

I

n November the first-ever ISO standard for human capital reporting was passed. Officially titled the “Human Resource Management — Guidelines for Internal and External Human Capital Reporting,” it was scheduled for publication Dec. 18.

Some background: ISO is the International Organization for Standardization. It is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies — the ISO member bodies.

The member body for the United States in the ISO is ANSI — the American National Standards Institute. The work of preparing international standards is normally carried out through ISO Technical Committees. In this case, the work was done by Technical Committee 260.

In 2011-12, there was an ANSI effort to create a human capital reporting standard for the United States. Those of us involved in the early ANSI work were disappointed when it failed to progress; we had hoped that an ANSI standard would eventually lead to an ISO standard. Although the ANSI effort was ultimately tabled, a subsequent ISO group formed to tackle the issue, resulting in the standard that was finalized Nov. 22.

Recruitment Process Outsourcing Providers

RPOs Do More Than You Think

Desire for enhanced recruiting features is driving adoption and development.

By Sarah Fister Gale

C

ompanies are struggling to understand to fill high-level positions, and they are looking to their recruitment process outsourcing providers for answers.

Those answers come in the form of data, said Aberdeen analyst Zach Chertok. Companies want RPOs to provide insights into where candidates come from, what draws to the company, what engages passive candidates, and where they need to look to find better talent. “RPOs recognize that being able to deliver that data to clients is an added value,” he said.

This focus on data is emerging from the ongoing frustration recruiting managers face in filling hard-to-fill talent gaps. A 2017 report from Aberdeen showed that 80 percent of organizations have trouble recruiting high-potential talent, and 79 percent of recruiting managers don’t know how to solve their talent problems.

Companies hope RPOs can help them close these gaps — while providing advanced analytics that describe a candidate’s skills, capabilities and attitude — to ensure they are a good fit. That’s driven many RPOs to partner with assessment vendors and human capital data analytics companies to provide assessment results about candidates in a seamless package to their clients. “These partnerships require investment, but the added value they get from clients looking for these services pays for itself,” he said.

Other RPOs are integrating their own machine learning and analytics capabilities to accelerate recruiting for clients, and providing this data through adaptable dashboards and reports that link to the client’s applicant tracking system. “Clients are really interested in reporting capabilities,” said Jeanne MacDonald of Korn Ferry. Having access to data about source of hire, assessment results and screen selection placement, along with more traditional résumé information is very appealing. “Their ATS can’t give them ‘process of hiring’ data, so they get really excited when they see it.”

Recruiting Software Providers

Recruiting Technology Is a Hot Commodity

Tricky hiring gaps and financing are bringing boutique firms to the recruiting solutions table.

By Sarah Fister Gale

R

ecruiting technology continues to be a hot investment space, with venture capitalists and global enterprise solution providers investing millions in developing and acquiring innovative new point solutions. By the end of the third quarter of 2018, investment volume in HR technology had nearly tripled what was invested in 2017.

“There is a lot of money going into all aspects of recruiting and talent acquisition,” said David Mallon, an analyst with Bersin by Deloitte. “It’s generating a lot of innovation, but also a lot of noise.”

Trends around social recruiting, mobile apps and video interviewing are now the norm, noted Barbara Marder, senior partner and global innovation leader at Mercer. “We are still seeing improvements in these areas but they are now entrenched in the talent acquisition process.”

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Last Word

Rick Bell

Public Sector Modernization Plan

Public Sector Modernization Plan

F

or several years I worked as a civilian contractor alongside service members at a military installation.

There was much to admire. Initially it was the unforgettable scope of ships housing 5,000 people like hulking, gray floating cities. Everyone had their jobs from running a post office to publishing the ship’s newspaper to making sure aircraft safely landed on the flight deck.

Whether it was aboard ship or on base it was clear that service members had a mission, a purpose — move with precision to serve the greater good of the organization and by extension make the country and the world a safer place to live.

January/February 2019 | Volume 98, Issue 1

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
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PRESIDENT
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Vice President, GROUP PUBLISHER
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VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF
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ASSOCIATE EDITORS
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ario@workforce.com

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Laurie Bassi
Jennifer Benz
Carol Brzozowski
Kris Dunn
Jerry Glass
China Gorman
Sarah Fister Gale
Jon Hyman
Patty Kujawa
Dan McMurrer
Dale Pazdra
Rita Pyrillis
Daniel Saeedi
Heather M. Sager
Rachel L. Schaller

WORKFORCE EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Arie Ball, Vice President, Sourcing and Talent Acquisition, Sodexo
Angela Bailey, Associate Director and Chief Human Capital Officer, U.S. Office of Personnel Management
Kris Dunn, Chief Human Resources Officer, Kinetix, and Founder, Fistful of Talent and HR Capitalist
Curtis Gray, Senior Vice President, Human Resources and Administration, BAE Systems
Jil Greene, Vice President, Human Resources and Community Relations, Harrah’s New Orleans
Ted Hoff, Human Resources Vice President, Global Sales and Sales Incentives, IBM
Tracy Kofski, Vice President, Compensation and Benefits, General Mills
Jon Hyman, Partner, Meyers, Roman, Friedberg & Lewis
Jim McDermid, Vice President, Human Resources, Cardiac and Vascular Group, Medtronic
Randall Moon, Vice President, International HR, Benefits and HRIS, Lowe’s Cos.
Dan Satterthwaite, Head of Human Resources, DreamWorks
Dave Ulrich, Professor, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan

Workforce (ISSN 2331-2793) is published bi-monthly by MediaTec Publishing Inc., 111 E. Wacker Dr., Suite 1200, Chicago IL 60601. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Workforce, P.O. Box 8712 Lowell, MA 01853. Subscriptions are free to qualified professionals within the US and Canada. Digital free subscriptions are available worldwide. Nonqualified paid subscriptions are available at the subscription price of $199 for 6 issues. All countries outside the US and Canada must be prepaid in US funds with an additional $33 postage surcharge. Single price copy is $29.99

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Upcoming!

February 20

Building A Culture of Meditation In Your Organization

Check out what you’ve missed!

December 12

Making a Business Case for Soft Skills

December 13

Creating a Recruiting Strategy that Embraces Change

Available live on the air date and on-demand for one year after unless otherwise specified. Check them out today and keep the education going!
www.workforce.com/wf-events/

Thanks for reading our January/February 2019 issue!